psyche

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See also: Psyche, Psyché, psyché, and Psýché

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology 1[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin psychē, itself a borrowing from Ancient Greek ψυχή (psukhḗ, soul).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • enPR: sī'kē, IPA(key): /ˈsaɪ.ki/
    • (file)

Noun[edit]

psyche (plural psyches)

  1. The human soul, mind, or spirit.
    • 2022 January 28, Em Beihold, Nick Lopez, Dru DeCaro, “Numb Little Bug”, in Egg in the Backseat[1], performed by Em Beihold:
      I've been driving in L.A. / And the world, it feels too big / Like a floating ball that's bound to break / Snap my psyche like a twig
    • 2023 November 20, Rory Carroll, Lisa O'Carroll, “‘It’s part of our psyche’: why Ireland sides with ‘underdog’ Palestine”, in The Guardian[2], →ISSN:
      We feel we have been victimised over the centuries. It’s part of our psyche – underneath it all we side with the underdog.”
  2. (chiefly psychology) The human mind as the central force in thought, emotion, and behavior of an individual.
  3. A small white butterfly, Leptosia nina, family Pieridae, of Asia and Australasia.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Shortened form of psychology, from French psychologie, from Latin psychologia, from Ancient Greek ψυχή (psukhḗ, soul) and -λογία (-logía, study of)

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

psyche (uncountable)

  1. Abbreviation of psychology.

Interjection[edit]

psyche

  1. (colloquial) Alternative form of psych

Verb[edit]

psyche (third-person singular simple present psyches, present participle psyching, simple past and past participle psyched)

  1. Alternative form of psych

Further reading[edit]

Dutch[edit]

Dutch Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nl

Etymology[edit]

From Latin psychē, from Ancient Greek ψυχή (psukhḗ).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: psy‧che

Noun[edit]

psyche f (plural psyches)

  1. psyche, soul, spirit

Derived terms[edit]

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Transliteration of Ancient Greek ψυχή (psukhḗ, soul, breath)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

psychē f (genitive psychēs); first declension

  1. mind
  2. spirit

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun (Greek-type).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative psychē psychae
Genitive psychēs psychārum
Dative psychae psychīs
Accusative psychēn psychās
Ablative psychē psychīs
Vocative psychē psychae

Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin psychē, from Ancient Greek ψυχή (psukhḗ).

Noun[edit]

psyche f (indeclinable)

  1. (literary, psychoanalysis) psyche (the human soul, mind, or spirit)
    Synonym: psychika

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from French psyché, from Ancient Greek ψυχή (psukhḗ).

Noun[edit]

psyche f (indeclinable)

  1. cheval glass
Related terms[edit]
noun

Further reading[edit]

  • psyche in Polish dictionaries at PWN