pudeur

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French pudeur, from Latin pudor.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pudeur (countable and uncountable, plural pudeurs)

  1. A sense of modesty or reserve, especially as relating to sexual matters.
    • 1861, Caroline Clive, chapter VII, in Why Paul Ferroll Killed His Wife, page 137–8:
      Leslie felt confident enough of that also, but the pudeur of composition (when the author has written what he felt) made him shrink from so much talk about it.
    • 1868, Paschal Beverly Randolph, chapter X, in After Death: Or, Disembodied Man, page 132:
      In preceding pages I have mooted a long-contested point of great importance, promising to recur it at a subsequent stage of this essay. I do so now because the pudeur of others has hitherto prevented its just discussion.
    • 1994, Janet Lungstrum, Peter J. Burgard, editor, Nietzsche Writing Woman/Woman Writing Nietzsche: The Sexual Dialectic of Palingenesis, quoted in Nietzche and the Femenine, →ISBN, page 152:
      Nietzsche, the conquering Dionysus-creator, thus confesses to having the pudeurs of a blushing bride, or of his faking Weib, when she “gives herself.”

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pudor (modesty, chastity).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pudeur f (plural pudeurs)

  1. sense of modesty or reserve; shame
    • Voltaire:
      La pudeur passe, et l'amour seul demeure.
  2. sense of decency, chastity, propriety
    • 30 janvier 1901, Jules Renard, (journal):
      La rose a la couleur de la pudeur mais elle a aussi celle du mensonge.

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