pudor

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pudor (sense of modesty or shame), from pudet (it shames), as is pudency (via pudentia).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈpjuːdɔː/, /ˈpjuːdər/

Noun[edit]

pudor (uncountable)

  1. An appropriate sense of modesty or shame.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses:
      Woman, undoing with sweet pudor her belt of rushrope, offers her allmoist yoni to man’s lingam.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

Catalan[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pudōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pudor m (plural pudors)

  1. shame
    Synonym: vergonya
  2. modesty

Etymology 2[edit]

From Latin pūtōrem. First attested in the 14th century.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pudor f (plural pudors)

  1. stench, malodor

Further reading[edit]

  • “pudor” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From pudet (it shames) +‎ -or.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pudor m (genitive pudōris); third declension

  1. A sense of shame; shamefacedness, shyness; ignominy, disgrace; humiliation.
    Synonym: verēcundia
    • 43 BCEc. 17 CE, Ovid, Fasti 5.593-594:
      Parthe, refers aquilās, vīctōs quoque porrigis arcūs:
      pignora iam nostrī nūlla pudōris habēs.
      Parthian, you are returning the eagles, you are extending the vanquished bows as well: Now you have no tokens of our shame.
      (See: Phraates V; Aquila (Roman).)
  2. Modesty, decency, propriety, scrupulousness, chastity.
  3. A blush.

Declension[edit]

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative pudor pudōrēs
Genitive pudōris pudōrum
Dative pudōrī pudōribus
Accusative pudōrem pudōrēs
Ablative pudōre pudōribus
Vocative pudor pudōrēs

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Catalan: pudor
  • English: pudor
  • French: pudeur
  • Italian: pudore
  • Portuguese: pudor
  • Romanian: pudoare
  • Spanish: pudor

References[edit]

  • pudor”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • pudor”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • pudor in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • pudor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette

Portuguese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Learned borrowing from Latin pudōrem.

Pronunciation[edit]

 
 
  • (Portugal) IPA(key): /puˈdoɾ/ [puˈðoɾ]
    • (Southern Portugal) IPA(key): /puˈdo.ɾi/ [puˈðo.ɾi]

  • Rhymes: (Portugal, São Paulo) -oɾ, (Brazil) -oʁ
  • Hyphenation: pu‧dor

Noun[edit]

pudor m (plural pudores)

  1. pudor (appropriate sense of modesty or shame)

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /puˈdoɾ/ [puˈð̞oɾ]
  • Rhymes: -oɾ
  • Syllabification: pu‧dor

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowed from Latin pudōrem.

Noun[edit]

pudor m (plural pudores)

  1. shame
    Synonym: vergüenza
  2. modesty
    Synonym: modestia
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Inherited from Latin pūtōrem.

Noun[edit]

pudor m (plural pudores)

  1. stench, malodor, fetidness (bad smell)
    Synonym: hedor, hediondez
Related terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]