replicate

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin replicātus, past participle of replicāre (to fold or bend back; reply), from re (back) + plicāre (to fold); see ply.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛpləˌkeɪt/ (verb)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɹɛpləˌkət/ (noun)

Verb[edit]

replicate (third-person singular simple present replicates, present participle replicating, simple past and past participle replicated)

  1. To make a copy (replica) of.
    On entering a host cell, a virus will start to replicate.
    • 2020 August 26, Tim Dunn, “Great railway bores of our time!”, in Rail, page 46:
      It is the Northern portals that are most interesting. The earlier structure was given the romantic, grotto-like feature of a tower with windows. When expanded (circa 1893), the engineers chose to replicate that design, seemingly extending the castle further.
  2. (sciences) To repeat (an experiment or trial) with a consistent result.
    • 2014 June 21, “Magician’s brain”, in The Economist, volume 411, number 8892:
      [Isaac Newton] was obsessed with alchemy. He spent hours copying alchemical recipes and trying to replicate them in his laboratory. He believed that the Bible contained numerological codes.
  3. (obsolete) To reply.

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

replicate (plural replicates)

  1. The outcome of a replication procedure; an exact copy or replica.
  2. (music) A tone that is one or more octaves away from a given tone.

Adjective[edit]

replicate (comparative more replicate, superlative most replicate)

  1. (botany, zoology) Folded over or backward; folded back upon itself.
    a replicate leaf or petal
    the replicate margin of a shell

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Verb[edit]

replicate

  1. second-person plural present of replicare
  2. second-person plural imperative of replicare

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

replicāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of replicō