revertor

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search

Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From re- +‎ vertō ‎(turn).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

revertor ‎(present infinitive revertī, perfect active reversus sum); third conjugation, deponent

  1. I return.
  2. I turn back, turn around.

Inflection[edit]

   Conjugation of revertor (third conjugation, deponent)
indicative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present revertor reverteris, revertere revertitur revertimur revertiminī revertuntur
imperfect revertēbar revertēbāris, revertēbāre revertēbātur revertēbāmur revertēbāminī revertēbantur
future revertar revertēris, revertēre revertētur revertēmur revertēminī revertentur
perfect reversus + present active indicative of sum
pluperfect reversus + imperfect active indicative of sum
future perfect reversus + future active indicative of sum
subjunctive singular plural
first second third first second third
active present revertar revertāris, revertāre revertātur revertāmur revertāminī revertantur
imperfect reverterer reverterēris, reverterēre reverterētur reverterēmur reverterēminī reverterentur
perfect reversus + present active subjunctive of sum
pluperfect reversus + imperfect active subjunctive of sum
imperative singular plural
first second third first second third
active present revertere revertiminī
future revertitor revertitor revertuntor
non-finite forms active passive
present perfect future present perfect future
infinitives revertī reversus esse reversūrus esse reversum īrī
participles revertēns reversus reversūrus revertendus
verbal nouns gerund supine
nominative genitive dative/ablative accusative accusative ablative
revertī revertendī revertendō revertendum reversum reversū

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • revertor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • revertor in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to come back to the point: ad propositum reverti, redire
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: sed ad id, unde digressi sumus, revertamur
    • but to return from the digression we have been making: verum ut ad id, unde digressa est oratio, revertamur
    • to recover one's reason, be reasonable again: ad sanitatem reverti, redire