roaming

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English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

roaming

  1. present participle of roam

Noun[edit]

roaming (countable and uncountable, plural roamings)

  1. (countable) An instance of wandering.
    • 2009 February 15, Judith Martin, “It Started in Naples”, in New York Times[1]:
      That last problem did intrude on Hazzard’s roamings, and when she refers to the living city it is with periodic references to thefts of cars and wallets, with a warning not to carry anything “snatchable” by the thieves on motorcycles who whiz through the streets.
  2. (uncountable, telecommunications) The ability to use a cell phone outside of its original registering zone.
  3. (uncountable, computing, telecommunications) The use of a network or service from different locations or devices.
  4. (uncountable, computing, operating system) Using the OS service of manipulating folders and documents from different PC devices by a registered user.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Polish[edit]

Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English roaming.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

roaming m inan

  1. (computing, telecommunications) roaming (using a cell phone outside of its original registering zone)

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

adjective

Further reading[edit]

  • roaming in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • roaming in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English roaming.

Noun[edit]

roaming n (uncountable)

  1. roaming

Declension[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Unadapted borrowing from English roaming.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈromin/, [ˈro.mĩn]

Noun[edit]

roaming m (plural roamings)

  1. roaming (telephony)

Usage notes[edit]

According to Royal Spanish Academy (RAE) prescriptions, unadapted foreign words should be written in italics in a text printed in roman type, and vice versa, and in quotation marks in a manuscript text or when italics are not available. In practice, this RAE prescription is not always followed.