rother

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See also: Rother and röther

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English rother, ruther, reother, from Old English hrūþer, hrȳþer, byforms of hrīþer, hrīþ (neat; ox), from Proto-Germanic *hrunþaz, *hrinþaz. Cognate with Dutch rund (ox), German Rind (bovine; beef).

Noun[edit]

rother (plural rothers)

  1. (obsolete) A horned animal, especially an ox.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English rother, from Old English rōþor. See rudder.

Noun[edit]

rother (plural rothers)

  1. A rudder.
Derived terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


German[edit]

Adjective[edit]

rother

  1. inflection of roth:
    1. strong/mixed nominative masculine singular
    2. strong genitive/dative feminine singular
    3. strong genitive plural

Middle English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old English rōþor, from Proto-Germanic *rōþrą; compare rowen.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈroːðər/, /ˈroːdər/

Noun[edit]

rother (plural rothers)

  1. A rudder or till; a steering implement for a ship.
  2. An oar; a long stick used for a boat's propulsion.
  3. (rare) One who steers a boat (i.e. using a rudder)
  4. (rare) A stick for mixing malt during brewing.
  5. (rare, figuratively) An administrator or director.
Descendants[edit]
  • English: rudder, rother
  • Scots: rudder, ruther, ruder
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old English hrīþer, hrūþer, from Proto-Germanic *hrinþaz, *hrunþaz.

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈruðər/, /ˈrɔðər/, /ˈriðər/, /ˈrɛðər/

Noun[edit]

rother (plural roþers or rothern)

  1. Any kind or gender of bovine or bovid.
Descendants[edit]
References[edit]