setter

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See also: Setter

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English settere, equivalent to set +‎ -er. Compare West Frisian setter, Dutch zetter, German Low German Setter, German Setzer.

Noun[edit]

setter (plural setters)

  1. A typesetter.
  2. One who sets something, such as a challenge or an examination.
    The exam was so hard we assumed the question setter must have been in a bad mood.
    Some crossword setters work for various newspapers under different pseudonyms.
  3. A long-haired breed of gundog (Wikipedia).
    She has a spaniel and a red setter.
    • 1931, Francis Beeding, “7/2”, in The Norwich Victims[1]:
      The two Gordon setters came obediently to heel. Sir Oswald Feiling winced as he turned to go home. He had felt a warning twinge of lumbago.
  4. (volleyball) The player who is responsible for setting, or passing, the ball to teammates for an attack.
  5. (object-oriented programming) A function used to modify the value of some property of an object, contrasted with the getter.
  6. (sports, in combinations) A game or match that lasts a certain number of sets.
    • 2012 June 29, Kevin Mitchell, “Roger Federer back from Wimbledon 2012 brink to beat Julien Benneteau”, in The Guardian[2], archived from the original on 15 November 2016:
      It was desperately close until all but the closing moments, and for that we had the 32nd-ranked [Julien] Benneteau to thank for bringing the fight out in [Roger] Federer, whose thirst for these long battles has waned over the past couple of years. For a player regarded by many as the greatest of all time his record in completed five-setters is ordinary: now 20 wins, 16 losses.
  7. One who hunts victims for sharpers.
  8. One who adapts words to music in composition.
  9. A shallow seggar for porcelain[1].
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Descendants[edit]
  • Czech: setr
  • Danish: setter
  • French: setter
  • German: Setter
  • Italian: setter
  • Russian: сеттер (setter)
  • Swedish: setter
Translations[edit]
See also[edit]
References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Verb[edit]

setter (third-person singular simple present setters, present participle settering, simple past and past participle settered)

  1. (UK, dialect, transitive) To cut the dewlap (of a cow or ox), and insert a seton, so as to cause an issue.

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1839, Andrew Ure, A Dictionary of Arts, Manufactures, and Mines,

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English setter.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

setter m (plural setters)

  1. setter (dog)

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English setter.

Noun[edit]

setter m (invariable)

  1. setter (dog)

Further reading[edit]

  • setter in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Verb[edit]

setter

  1. present of sette

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

setter c

  1. setter (dog)

Declension[edit]

Declension of setter 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative setter settern settrar settrarna
Genitive setters setterns settrars settrarnas

References[edit]