swager

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: Swager

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Recorded in neither Old English nor Middle English. Perhaps a borrowing from Dutch or Low German, but this derivation is rather unlikely due to the presence of the words like sweyr (mother-in-law) and swier (father-in-law) in some East Midlands dialects, which are derived from attested Old English and Middle English words sweger and sweor, respectively. Ultimately derived from Proto-Germanic *swēgraz (husband's brother), from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱuros (husband's father).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (Midlands) IPA(key): /ˈswɛ(ː)ɡ(.)ə(ɹ)/
  • (rural areas of Scotland) IPA(key): /ˈswäɡ(.)əɹ/

Noun[edit]

swager (plural swagers)

  1. (dialectal, rural) A brother-in-law.
    Mehe swager wooner deh nowt at aw fer 'is kenship. 'e is a coont.

References[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

swage +‎ -er

Noun[edit]

swager (plural swagers)

  1. A tool that performs swaging.

Anagrams[edit]


Middle Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *swāgar, from Proto-Germanic *swēgraz.

Noun[edit]

swâger m

  1. male in-law
    1. brother-in-law
    2. son-in-law
    3. father-in-law

Inflection[edit]

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • swagher”, in Vroegmiddelnederlands Woordenboek, 2000
  • swager”, in Middelnederlandsch Woordenboek, 1929