tabloid

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See also: tabloïd and Tabloid

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a trademark for a medicine compressed into a tablet. See -oid and the Etymology section of the Wikipedia article "Tabloid".

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtæ.blɔɪd/
    • (file)

Noun[edit]

tabloid (plural tabloids)

  1. (publishing) A newspaper having pages half the dimensions of the standard format.
  2. (publishing) A newspaper, especially one in this format, that favours stories of a sensational or even fictitious nature over serious news.
    Synonyms: scandal sheet, (colloquial) tab, red top, yellow press
    • 2009 January 20, Dan Shive, El Goonish Shive (webcomic), Comic for Tuesday, Jan 20, 2009:
      "A public school in Moperville, where the local newspaper is sold in neighboring towns with all the regard of a tabloid. We've got a reputation to protect! We can only report on confirmed monsters, like mega hogs, or Bigfoot!"
  3. (medicine, obsolete) A compressed portion of drugs, chemicals, etc.; a tablet.
    • 1911, Rudyard Kipling, “In the Same Boat”:
      ‘It’s those tabloids!’ Conroy stamped his foot feebly as he blew his nose. ‘They’ve knocked me out. I used to be fit once.’
    • 1914 October 11, The Sunday Times, Perth, Australia, page 1, column 9:
      "Next!" steps gingerly in to confront the medical eye fastened questioningly upon him. "Crook in the guts," he says tersely. The picturesque reports of previously treated and disgusted patients - have left him doubtful, and he casts, an anathematising eye upon the "Black Jack" bottle. "Tabloids and duty!" says the doctor, and the sufferer sighs with relief.

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

tabloid (not comparable)

  1. In the format of a tabloid.
  2. Relating to a tabloid or tabloids.
    tabloid journalism
    • 1976, Paddy Chayefsky, Network, spoken by Diana Christensen (Faye Dunaway):
      I watched your 6 o'clock news today; it's straight tabloid. You had a minute and a half of that lady riding a bike naked in Central Park; on the other hand, you had less than a minute of hard national and international news.
    • 2013 June 22, “Snakes and ladders”, in The Economist[1], volume 407, number 8841, page 76:
      Risk is everywhere. From tabloid headlines insisting that coffee causes cancer (yesterday, of course, it cured it) to stern government warnings about alcohol and driving, the world is teeming with goblins. For each one there is a frighteningly precise measurement of just how likely it is to jump from the shadows and get you.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


Italian[edit]

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English tabloid.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /taˈblɔjd/
  • Rhymes: -ɔjd
  • Hyphenation: ta‧blòid

Noun[edit]

tabloid m (invariable)

  1. tabloid

Polish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English tabloid.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tabˈlɔ.it/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔit
  • Syllabification: tab‧lo‧id

Noun[edit]

tabloid m inan

  1. tabloid
    Synonyms: brukowiec, szmatławiec

Declension[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • tabloid in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • tabloid in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English tabloid or French tabloïde.

Adjective[edit]

tabloid m or n (feminine singular tabloidă, masculine plural tabloizi, feminine and neuter plural tabloide)

  1. tabloid

Declension[edit]

Noun[edit]

tabloid n (plural tabloizi)

  1. tabloid

Declension[edit]