tonne

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See also: Tonne, tonné, and tønne

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French tonne (metric ton). Doublet of ton and tun.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tonne (plural tonnes)

  1. (chiefly UK) Synonym of metric ton, a unit of mass equal to 1000 kg.
    • 1961 February, “Letters to the Editor: Swiss railways”, in Trains Illustrated, page 126:
      Although loads of up to 900 tonnes could be handled by one of these locomotives, in practice the load is limited to 790 tonnes by drawgear.
    • 1971. Transactions of the Royal Institute of Naval Arcihtects, page 215, volume 113, 1971
      The metric ton or 'tonne' is accepted as a synonym for the megagramme, and this form Is to be preferred on the grounds of brevity and familiarity in the industry. It may be as well to use the pronunciation 'tunnie' until the risk of confusion with the old ton has passed.
    • 1972, Which, May 1972
      The British Steel Corporation, going metric but realising the possible confusion between a ton and a tonne (1,000 kilograms) has directed its staff to pronounce ‘tonne’ ‘tunnie’.
    • 2002, Richard Chapman, Physics for Geologists, CRC Press, published 2002, →ISBN, page 138:
      The tonne rhymes with con (perhaps not in North America!) to distinguish it from the non-SI unit of weight, the ton rhyming with bun.
  2. (colloquial, darts) Synonym of ton, a score of 100.

Usage notes[edit]

Even in British and Commonwealth use, the Americanism metric ton is sometimes employed where confusion might arise with the traditional English tons of 2000 or 2240 pounds. Alternatively, variant pronunciations of tonne have been promoted to help clarify its meaning. In particular, the British steel industry advocated fot the pronunciation /ˈtʌni/ ("tunnie") during the 1970s and /tɒn/ is sometimes used for the same purpose.

Anagrams[edit]


Estonian[edit]

Noun[edit]

tonne

  1. partitive plural of tonn

Finnish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈtonːeˣ/, [ˈt̪o̞nːe̞(ʔ)]
  • Rhymes: -onːe
  • Syllabification(key): ton‧ne

Adverb[edit]

tonne

  1. (colloquial, of movement) Alternative form of tuonne (there (when the speaker points at the place))
    Me mentiin tonne.
    We went there.

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French, from Vulgar Latin tunna, tonna, itself from a Celtic word cognate to Irish tonn.

Noun[edit]

tonne f (plural tonnes)

  1. tonne, metric ton
  2. ton
Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

tonne

  1. inflection of tonner:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Etymology 2[edit]

Compare tonnelet (English tonlet).

Noun[edit]

tonne f (plural tonnes)

  1. (historical) a tonlet; a piece of medieval European armor of articulated lames protecting the hips and thighs
    • 1885, Brussels (Belgium). Musées royaux des arts décoratifs et industriels, Catalogue des armes et armures, page 70:
      Pour combattre à pied, les gentilshommes employaient une armure spéciale qui, à cause de sa longue jupe de fer évasée et sans tassettes , s'appelait tonnelet, armure à tonne, armure pour combattre à pied; []
      XVIe siècle. Une belle armure à tonne, ayant []
      (please add an English translation of this quote)
    • 2008, Marie-Anne Michaux, Glossaire des termes militaires du seizième siècle: complément du Dictionnaire de la langue française du XVIe siècle d'Edmond Huguet, Honoré Champion, →ISBN:
      Ces harnois peuvent être à tonne ou tonnelet, c'est-à-dire avec une sorte de jupe de métal évasée protégeant le haut des jambes. Ils peuvent aussi être construits à la manière d'une « combinaison » : le bas du corps est recouvert []
      (please add an English translation of this quote)

Further reading[edit]


Woccon[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Compare Catawba nepe(ⁿ), nəpe(ⁿ), nepaⁿ, dəpe(ⁿ), dapa(ⁿ), dəpən, dube. Compare also noponne, which features in the word for "ten". Two Proto-Siouan roots for "one" can be reconstructed: Proto-Siouan-Catawban *nǫ(ːsa), rǫ(ːsa) (apparently whence this word) and *wįyą, each one found in one branch and almost entirely missing from the other. (* is importantly also found in Quapaw hi xtį "once, one time", where -xtį is the morpheme denoting "_ times".)[1]

Numeral[edit]

tonne

  1. one

References[edit]

  • A Vocabulary of Woccon →ISBN, extracted from A New Voyage to Carolina by John Lawson
  1. ^ Robert Rankin, A Relic of Proto-Siouan */ "one" in Mississippi Valley Siouan