troth

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English troth, trothe, trouthe, trowthe, a variant of treuth, treuthe, treouthe (allegiance, fidelity, faithfulness, loyalty; oath, pledge, promise; betrothal or marriage vow; betrothal; honour, integrity; holiness, righteousness; confidence, trust; creed, faith; fact, reality, truth), from Old English trēowþ, trīewþ (truth, veracity; faith, fidelity; covenant, pledge),[1] from Proto-Germanic *triwwiþō (contract; promise), equivalent to true +‎ -th. See further at truth.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

troth (countable and uncountable, plural troths)

  1. (countable, archaic) An oath, pledge, or promise.
  2. (countable, specifically) A pledge or promise to marry someone.
  3. (countable, specifically) The state of being thus pledged; betrothal, engagement.
  4. (uncountable) Truth.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ treuth, n.” in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 28 May 2018.

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]