vandal

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Vandal, vandál, and vàndal

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Etymology[edit]

1660s, “willful destroyer of what is beautiful or venerable”,[1] from Vandal, referring to a member of an ancient Germanic people, the Vandals, who are associated with senseless destruction as a result of their sack of Rome under King Genseric in 455. During the Enlightenment, Rome was idealized, while the Goths and Vandals were blamed for its destruction. The Vandals may not have been any more destructive than other invaders of ancient times, but they did inspire English poet John Dryden to write, Till Goths, and Vandals, a rude Northern race, Did all the matchless Monuments deface (1694).[2] However, the Vandals did intentionally damage statues, which may be why their name is associated with the vandalism of art. The coining of French Vandalisme by Henri Grégoire in 1794 to describe the destruction of artwork following the French Revolution popularized the idea further, and the term was quickly adopted across Europe, including as English vandalism.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈvændəl/
  • Rhymes: -ændəl
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

vandal (plural vandals)

  1. A person who needlessly destroys, defaces, or damages other people's property.
  2. (computing) A person who needlessly destroys, defaces, or damages software.
    The anonymous vandal was blocked after going on a vandalism spree.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2023), “vandal”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.
  2. ^ [John] Dryden (1694), “To Sir Godfrey Kneller”, in The Annual Miscellany: for the Year 1694. Being the Fourth Part of Miscellany Poems. Containing Great Variety of New Translations and Original Copies, by the Most Eminent Hands., London: [] R. E. for Jacob Tonson, [], page 90: “Till Goths and Vandals, a rude Northern Race, / Did all the matchless Monuments deface.”

Czech[edit]

Noun[edit]

vandal m

  1. vandal (person who needlessly destroys, defaces, or damages other people's property)

Further reading[edit]

  • vandal in Kartotéka Novočeského lexikálního archivu
  • vandal in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Manx[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from English vandal.

Noun[edit]

vandal m (genitive singular vandal, plural vandallyn)

  1. (historical) vandal

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vandali (plural).

Noun[edit]

vandal m (definite singular vandalen, indefinite plural vandaler, definite plural vandalene)

  1. (modern-day) a vandal
  2. (historical) a Vandal

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Norwegian Nynorsk Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia nn

Etymology[edit]

From Latin vandali (plural).

Noun[edit]

vandal m (definite singular vandalen, indefinite plural vandalar, definite plural vandalane)

  1. (modern-day) a vandal
  2. (historical) a Vandal

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French vandale.

Noun[edit]

vandal m (plural vandali)

  1. vandal
  2. Vandal

Declension[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

vandal c

  1. a vandal
  2. a Vandal (member of an ancient east Germanic tribe)

Declension[edit]

Declension of vandal 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative vandal vandalen vandaler vandalerna
Genitive vandals vandalens vandalers vandalernas

See also[edit]

References[edit]