verbiage

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French verbiage.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈvɜː(ɹ).bi.ɪdʒ/
    • (file)
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈvɚ.bi.ɪdʒ/

Noun[edit]

verbiage (countable and uncountable, plural verbiages)

  1. Overabundance of words.
    • 1929, Robert Dean Frisbee, The Book of Puka-Puka (republished by Eland, 2019; p. 39):
      A very garrulous person, he approached the counter in a fog of verbiage.
  2. The manner in which something is expressed in words.
    Bureaucratic verbiage.
    • 1846, Margaret Thornley, The True End of Education and the Means Adapted to It:
      The comparison of coincidences in the verbiage of different languages, and affinity of etymological formation, are interesting subjects of philological investigation.
    • 1947, George S. Patton, War as I Knew It:
      Use concise military verbiage.

Usage notes[edit]

Because of the pejorative connotation of the primary definition of verbiage it is preferred to use diction, phrasing, etc. to describe the manner in which something is expressed in words.

Translations[edit]

See also[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French verbier + -age.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

verbiage m (countable and uncountable, plural verbiages)

  1. verbiage

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]