windle

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See also: Windle

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Perhaps from wind.

Pronunciation[edit]

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Noun[edit]

windle (plural windles)

  1. (Britain, dialect) The redwing.
    • 1908, W. F. Rose, William White, editor, Notes and queries[1], page 48:
      The modus operandi somewhat recalls the stratagem of Gideon, for the birds—chiefly thrushes, blackbirds, fieldfares, redwings (locally "windles"), and starlings (smaller birds being disregarded)—terrified by the noise, and dazed by the lantern glare, suffered themselves to be taken by the hand, or, if roosting aloft, as was the case on still nights, to be knocked down with the poles which the lads carried.
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle English windle, windel, from Old English windel (basket), from Proto-Germanic *windilaz (wrap; diaper; plaitwork; basket), equivalent to wind +‎ -le. Related to Old English windan (to wind, twist).

Pronunciation[edit]

Phonetik.svg This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with enPR or the IPA then please add some!

Noun[edit]

windle (plural windles)

  1. An old English measure of corn, half a bushel.
    • 1882, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 4, p. 208.
      In the Derby household book of 1561, wheat, malt, and oats are sold by the quarter and the windle, in which the quarter clearly contained sixteen windles, and must have been a wholly different measure from that which we are familiar.
  2. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) dog-tail grass, Plantago lanceolata.
    • 1812, John Mawe, Travels in the Interior of Brazil:
      We rode by the side of a barren mountain, which was covered to an extent of three miles with quartz, and produced little or no herbage, except a species of wiry or windle-grass, which was much parched by the sun.
    • 1813, The Repertory of arts and manufactures:
      That he has given a fair character of the Crested dog's tail, I have proved by by repeated experiments; in the North of Ireland, we know its panicles but two well, under the name of windle straws.
    • 1886, A Glossary of Devonshire Plant Names, page 495:
      Windles. Plantago lanceolata, L.—A general name for the dry stalks of many grasses and several other pasture plants.
    • 2001, Brian Pearce, Exmoor: The Official National Park Guide, page 50:
      There are many locally distinctive names for landscape features: 'ball' for a rounded hillside spur such as Wimbleball, which means the ball where windle grass grows []
  3. Bent grass.

Verb[edit]

windle (third-person singular simple present windles, present participle windling, simple past and past participle windled)

  1. (transitive) To bind straw into bundles.

References[edit]

  • windle at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • windle in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911