Tom

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Tom

  1. A diminutive of the male given name Thomas, also used as a formal male given name.
    • 1605 William Shakespeare, King Lear, Act III, Scene IV:
      Poor Tom's a-cold.
    • 1876, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, ch. VI
      "Becky Thatcher. What's yours? Oh, I know. It's Thomas Sawyer."
      "That's the name they lick me by. I'm Tom when I'm good. You call me Tom, will you?"
    • 1934, P. G. Wodehouse, Right Ho, Jeeves:
      What I'm worrying about is what Tom says when he starts talking."
      "Uncle Tom?"
      "I wish there was something else you could call him except 'Uncle Tom'," said Aunt Dahlia a little testily. "Every time you do it, I expect to see him turn black and start playing the banjo."
    • 2008 David Park, The Truth Commissioner, ISBN 9780747591290, page 366:
      "We're not sure - we were expecting a girl for some reason. But we're thinking of something simple like Tom."
      "Thomas?"
      "No, just Tom."
  2. A nickname for the common man. [since 1377]
Translations[edit]

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Possibly onomatopoeia, conflated with the given name, given the practice of giving objects such as Big Ben human names. Alternatively, it may derive from an inscription on the old bell used as metal to make the Great Tom of Oxford in 1680: In Thomæ laude resono bim bom sine fraude.[1]

Proper noun[edit]

Tom

  1. A large, deep-toned bell, or a particularly notable example of one. [since 17th century]
    • 1857, William Chambers, Robert Chambers, "Something about bells", Chambers's Journal, vol. 28, no. 207, page 398.
      They had a thick rim, and when struck with pieces of wood, gave out a tone deeper than that of some of the Great Toms renowned in belldom.
    • 1857, "An earthquake in Honduras", Harper's Magazine:
      After these came innumerable little boys bearing little bells, which made little noises in comparison to the "Big Tom" that preceded them.
    • 1825, Moncrieff, "A Parish-Clerk was Johnny Bell", The Universal Songster (in a song about a man who hangs himself in the bell tower):
      And there little Johnny Bell hung dangling along with the great Tom bell, and all the rest of the bells.
    • 1848, "The book auction of New York", The Literary World:
      The city [New York] does not know a better auctioneer; the celebrated Tom Bell not ringing clearer.
Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bells", The Penny Magazine, pp.404-406, 1834.

Statistics[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Tom

  1. A male given name borrowed from English.

Dutch[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Tom ?

  1. A male given name borrowed from English.

German[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Tom

  1. A male given name borrowed from English.

Norwegian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From English Tom. Taken to regular use as a given name in Norway in the 20th century.

Proper noun[edit]

Tom

  1. A male given name.

Related terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • Kristoffer Kruken - Ola Stemshaug: Norsk personnamnleksikon, Det Norske Samlaget, Oslo 1995, ISBN 82-521-4483-7
  • [1] Statistisk sentralbyrå, Namnestatistikk: 15 517 males with the given name Tom living in Norway on January 1st 2011, with the frequency peak in the 1950s. Accessed on April 29th, 2011.

Portuguese[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Tom

  1. A diminutive of the male given name Antônio, cognate to English Tony.

Swedish[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Tom

  1. A male given name borrowed from English.