angst

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See also: Angst

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the German word Angst or the Danish word angst; attested since the 19th century in English translations of the works of Freud and Søren Kierkegaard. (George Eliot used the phrase complete with definite article: "die Angst".) Initially capitalized (as in German and contemporaneous Danish), the term first began to be written with a lowercase "a" around 1940–44.[1][2][3] The German and Danish terms both derive from Middle High German angest, from Old High German angust, from Proto-Germanic *angustiz; Dutch angst is cognate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

angst (uncountable)

  1. Emotional turmoil; painful sadness.
    • 1979, Peter Hammill, Mirror images
      I've begun to regret that we'd ever met / Between the dimensions. / It gets such a strain to pretend that the change / Is anything but cheap. / With your infant pique and your angst pretensions / Sometimes you act like such a creep.
    • 2007, Martyn Bone, Perspectives on Barry Hannah (page 3)
      Harry's adolescence is theatrical and gaudy, and many of its key scenes have a lurid and camp quality that is appropriate to the exaggerated mood-shifting and self-dramatizing of teen angst.
  2. A feeling of acute but vague anxiety or apprehension often accompanied by depression, especially philosophical anxiety.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

angst (third-person singular simple present angsts, present participle angsting, simple past and past participle angsted)

  1. (informal) To suffer angst; to fret.
    • 2001, Joseph P Natoli, Postmodern Journeys: Film and Culture, 1996-1998
      In the second scene, the camera switches to the father listening, angsting, dying inside, but saying nothing.
    • 2006, Liz Ireland, Three Bedrooms in Chelsea
      She'd never angsted so much about her head as she had in the past twenty-four hours. Why the hell hadn't she just left it alone?

References[edit]

  • Wikipedia-logo.png angst on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • angst” in The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition, Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
  • "angst" in WordNet 2.0, Princeton University, 2003.
  1. ^ angst” in Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary, Merriam-Webster Online
  2. ^ angst” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.0.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
  3. ^ Online Etymology Dictionary, "angst"

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Adjective[edit]

angst

  1. afraid, anxious, alarmed

Noun[edit]

angst c (singular definite angsten, not used in plural form)

  1. fear, alarm, apprehension, dread
  2. anxiety
  3. angst

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Dutch *angust, from Proto-Germanic *angustiz. Related to Dutch eng (narrow; scary). Cognate with German Angst.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

angst m (plural angsten, diminutive angstje n)

  1. fear, angst, anxiety

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Low German (compare German Angst).

Noun[edit]

angst m (definite singular angsten; uncountable)

  1. (singular only) angst

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]