fret

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See also: FRET

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English freten, from Old English fretan (to eat up, devour), from Proto-Germanic *fraetaną (to devour), corresponding to for- +‎ eat. Cognate with Dutch vreten, fretten (to devour, hog, wolf), Low German freten (to eat up), German fressen (to devour, gobble up, guzzle), Danish fråse (to gorge), Swedish fräta (to eat away, corrode, fret), Gothic 𐍆𐍂𐌰𐌹𐍄𐌰𐌽 (fraitan), 𐍆𐍂𐌰-𐌹𐍄𐌰𐌽 (fra-itan, to devour).

Verb[edit]

fret (third-person singular simple present frets, present participle fretting, simple past fretted, fret, freet or frate, past participle fretted or fretten (usually in compounds))

  1. (transitive, obsolete/poetic) To devour, consume; eat.
    • (Can we date this quote?)— Piers Ploughman.
      Adam freet of that fruit, And forsook the love of our Lord.
    • Wiseman
      Many wheals arose, and fretted one into another with great excoriation.
  2. (transitive and intransitive) To gnaw, consume, eat away.
  3. (intransitive) To be worn away; to chafe; to fray.
    A wristband frets on the edges.
  4. (transitive) To cut through with fretsaw, create fretwork.
  5. (transitive) To chafe or irritate; to worry.
  6. (intransitive) To worry or be anxious.
    • 1913, Joseph C. Lincoln, chapter 5, Mr. Pratt's Patients:
      Of all the queer collections of humans outside of a crazy asylum, it seemed to me this sanitarium was the cup winner. […] When you're well enough off so's you don't have to fret about anything but your heft or your diseases you begin to get queer, I suppose.
  7. To be vexed; to be chafed or irritated; to be angry; to utter peevish expressions.
    • Dryden
      He frets, he fumes, he stares, he stamps the ground.
  8. To make rough, agitate, or disturb; to cause to ripple.
    to fret the surface of water
  9. To be agitated; to be in violent commotion; to rankle.
    Rancour frets in the malignant breast.
  10. (music) To press down the string behind a fret.
  11. To ornament with raised work; to variegate; to diversify.
    • Spenser
      whose skirt with gold was fretted all about
    • Shakespeare
      Yon grey lines, / That fret the clouds, are messengers of day.
Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

fret (plural frets)

  1. The agitation of the surface of a fluid by fermentation or other cause; a rippling on the surface of water.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Addison to this entry?)
  2. Agitation of mind marked by complaint and impatience; disturbance of temper; irritation.
    He keeps his mind in a continual fret.
    • Pope
      Yet then did Dennis rave in furious fret.
  3. Herpes; tetter.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Dunglison to this entry?)
  4. (mining, in the plural) The worn sides of river banks, where ores, or stones containing them, accumulate by being washed down from the hills, and thus indicate to the miners the locality of the veins.

Etymology 2[edit]

Middle English < Old French, from the verb freter, probably from the Latin frictō, frequentive of fricō (I rub). See friction.

Noun[edit]

fret (plural frets)

  1. (music) One of the pieces of metal/wood/plastic across the neck of a guitar or other musical instrument that marks note positions for fingering.
  2. An ornamental pattern consisting of repeated vertical and horizontal lines (often in relief).
    • Evelyn
      His lady's cabinet is adorned on the fret, ceiling, and chimney-piece with [] carving.
  3. (heraldry) A saltire interlaced with a mascle.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 3[edit]

From Latin fretum (strait, channel)

Noun[edit]

fret (plural frets)

  1. A strait; channel.
Related terms[edit]

Etymology 4[edit]

Unknown

Noun[edit]

fret (plural frets)

  1. (dialectal, North East England) A fog or mist at sea or coming inland from the sea.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

fret m (plural fretten or frets, diminutive fretje n)

  1. ferret, Mustela putorius furo (plural only fretten)
  2. (music) fret, on the neck on for example a guitar

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Dutch vrecht, from Old Dutch *frēht, from Proto-Germanic *fra- + *aihtiz.

Noun[edit]

fret m (plural frets)

  1. (shipping) Freight, cargo fees: the cost of transporting cargo by boat.
  2. (by extension) Rental of a ship, in whole or in part.
  3. Freight, cargo, payload (of a ship).
    • 2008 March 9, Reuters, “L'ATV Jules Verne né sous une bonne étoile”,
      Il n'y aura plus alors que les vaisseaux Progress russes pour emmener du fret à bord de la station spatiale, et les Soyouz pour les vols habités.
      So there will only be the Russian Progress shuttles to take freight aboard the space station, and the Soyuz for manned flights.

External links[edit]


Gothic[edit]

Romanization[edit]

frēt

  1. Romanization of 𐍆𐍂𐌴𐍄

Old French[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

fret

  1. past participle of fraindre

Noun[edit]

fret m (oblique plural frés, nominative singular frés, nominative plural fret)

  1. charge (demand of payment in exchange for goods or services)