brag

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Mid-14th c. Middle English braggen (to make a loud noise; to speak boastfully) of unknown origin. Possibly related to the early-14th c. Middle English adjective brag (prideful, spirited), probably from Celtic;[1] or Old Norse bragr (best, foremost; poetry);[2] or through Old English from Old Norse braka (to creak).[3]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

brag (third-person singular simple present brags, present participle bragging, simple past and past participle bragged)

  1. (intransitive) To boast; to talk with excessive pride about what one has, can do, or has done.
    to brag of one's exploits, courage, or money
    • Shakespeare
      Conceit, more rich in matter than in words, / Brags of his substance, not of ornament.
  2. (transitive) To boast of.
    • Shakespeare
      Nor shall Death brag thou wander'st in his shade

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Noun[edit]

brag (plural brags)

  1. A boast or boasting; bragging; ostentatious pretence or self-glorification.
    • Shakespeare
      Caesar [] made not here his brag / Of "came", and "saw", and "overcame".
  2. The thing which is boasted of.
    • Milton
      Beauty is Nature's brag.
  3. (by ellipsis) The card game three card brag.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chesterfield to this entry?)

Translations[edit]

Adjective[edit]

brag (comparative bragger, superlative braggest)

  1. First-rate.
  2. (archaic) Brisk; full of spirits; boasting; pretentious; conceited.
    • Ben Jonson
    a brag young fellow

Adverb[edit]

brag (comparative more brag, superlative most brag)

  1. (obsolete) proudly; boastfully
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Fuller to this entry?)

References[edit]

  1. ^ brag” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).
  2. ^ wile” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).;
  3. ^ brag in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse brak.

Noun[edit]

brag n (singular definite braget, plural indefinite brag)

  1. bang, crash

Related terms[edit]

Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

brag

  1. Imperative of brage.

North Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian bregge, which derives from from Proto-Germanic *brugjǭ. Cognates include West Frisian brêge.

Noun[edit]

brag f (plural bragen)

  1. (Föhr-Amrum) bridge