cadaver

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See also: cadàver and cadáver

English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

Recorded since c.1500, from Latin cadāver, probably from cadō (I fall) as a metaphor for "I die", also source (through combining form -cida) of the -cide in suicide, homicide etc.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kəˈdæv.ə(ɹ)/, /kəˈdɑːv.ə(ɹ)/, /kəˈdeɪ.və(ɹ)/[1][2]
  • (US) IPA(key): /kəˈdævɚ/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ca‧dav‧er

Noun[edit]

cadaver (plural cadavers)

  1. A dead body; especially the corpse of a human to be dissected.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ [1]
  2. ^ [2]

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin verb cadō (I fall), as a euphemism for dying, "the fallen one". This etymology is found as early as ca. 200 CE in the writings of Tertullian, who associated cadaver to cadendo : Atque adeo caro est quae morte subruitur, ut exinde a cadendo cadaver enuntietur. (Tertullian, De Resurrectione Carnis).

A folk etymology derives cadaver syllabically from the Latin expression caro data vermibus (flesh given to worms). This etymology, more popular in Romance countries, can be traced back as early as the Schoolmen of the Middle Ages.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA SAMPA
Classical /kaˈdaːwer/ /ka"da:wer/
Ecclesiastical /kaˈdaver/ /ka"daver/

Noun[edit]

cadāver n (genitive cadāveris); third declension

  1. A corpse, cadaver, carcass

Derived terms[edit]

Inflection[edit]

Third declension neuter.

Number Singular Plural
nominative cadāver cadāvera
genitive cadāveris cadāverum
dative cadāverī cadāveribus
accusative cadāver cadāvera
ablative cadāvere cadāveribus
vocative cadāver cadāvera

References[edit]

  • Tertullian. On the Resurrection of the Flesh. Chapter 18.
    Quote: “So that it is the flesh which falls by death; and accordingly it derives its name, cadaver, from cadendo.” [3]