chock

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Anglo-Norman choque (compare modern Norman chouque), from Gaulish *śokka (compare Breton soc’h (thick), Old Irish tócht (part, piece)).

Noun[edit]

chock (plural chocks)

  1. Any wooden block used as a wedge or filler
  2. (nautical) Any fitting or fixture used to restrict movement, especially movement of a line; traditionally was a fixture near a bulwark with two horns pointing towards each other, with a gap between where the line can be inserted.
  3. Blocks made of either wood, plastic or metal, used to keep a parked aircraft in position.
    • 2000, Lindbergh: A Biography, by Leonard Mosley, page 82
      On April 28, 1927, on Dutch Flats, below San Diego, Charles Lindbergh signaled chocks-away to those on the ground below him.
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

chock (third-person singular simple present chocks, present participle chocking, simple past and past participle chocked)

  1. (transitive) To stop or fasten, as with a wedge, or block; to scotch.
  2. (intransitive) To fill up, as a cavity.
    • Fuller
      The woodwork [] exactly chocketh into joints.
  3. (nautical) To insert a line in a chock.
Translations[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Adverb[edit]

chock (not comparable)

  1. (nautical) Entirely; quite.
    chock home; chock aft

Etymology 2[edit]

French choquer. Compare shock (transitive verb).

Noun[edit]

chock (plural chocks)

  1. (obsolete) An encounter.

Verb[edit]

chock (third-person singular simple present chocks, present participle chocking, simple past and past participle chocked)

  1. (obsolete) To encounter.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Etymology 3[edit]

Onomatopoeic.

Verb[edit]

chock (third-person singular simple present chocks, present participle chocking, simple past and past participle chocked)

  1. To make a dull sound.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 1
      She saw him hurry to the door, heard the bolt chock. He tried the latch.

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

chock c

  1. shock

Declension[edit]

Related terms[edit]