gob

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English[edit]

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Etymology[edit]

From Irish and/or Scottish Gaelic gob (beak, bill). See also gobbet.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gob (countable and uncountable, plural gobs)

  1. (countable) A lump of soft or sticky material.
    • 1952, The Glass Industry, Volume 33, Ashlee Publishing Company, page 309,
      These inventors have discovered that gobs may be fed at widely spaced times without allowing the glass to flow during the interval but instead flushes[sic] out the chilled glass which accumulates during the dwell.
  2. (countable, UK, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland, slang) The mouth.
    He′s always stuffing his gob with fast food.
    Oi, you, shut your gob!
    She's got such a gob on her – she′s always gossiping about someone or other.
  3. (uncountable, slang) Saliva or phlegm.
    He spat a big ball of gob on to the pavement.
  4. (US, military, slang) A sailor.
    • 1944 November, Fitting the Gob to the Job, Popular Mechanics, page 18,
      For the first time in history, new warship crews are virtually “prefabricated” by modern methods of fitting the gob to the job.
    • 1948 June, Fred B. Barton, Mending Broken Gobs, The Rotarian, page 22,
      Taking a safe average of 2,000 rehabilitated young gobs a year, that′s a total of 100,000 years of salvaged manhood, a target worth shooting at.
  5. (uncountable, mining) Waste material in old mine workings, goaf.
    • 1930, Engineering and Mining Journal, Volume 130, page 330,
      This consisted in wheeling gob back to the most distant part of the stope and filling up the sets right up to the roof.

Synonyms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

gob (third-person singular simple present gobs, present participle gobbing, simple past and past participle gobbed)

  1. To gather into a lump.
    • 1997 March, William G. Tapply, How to Catch a Trout on a Sandwich, Field & Stream, page 60,
      I liked to gob up two or three worms on a snelled hook, pinch three or four split shot onto the leader, and plunk it into the dark water.
  2. To spit, especially to spit phlegm.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish gop, from Proto-Celtic *gobbo- (mouth) (compare French gober (gulp down) and gobelet (goblet) from Gaulish) from Proto-Indo-European *ǵebʰ- (jaw, mouth); compare jowl from Old English ċēafl; German Kiefer (jaw).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gob m (genitive goib, nominative plural goba)

  1. beak, bill (of a bird etc.)
  2. tip, point, projection
  3. pointy nose

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

gob (present analytic gobann, future analytic gobfaidh, verbal noun gobadh, past participle gobtha)

  1. peck (as a bird etc.)
  2. project, stick out, up

Conjugation[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
gob ghob ngob
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Scottish Gaelic[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish gop, from Proto-Celtic *gobbo- (mouth), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵebʰ- (jaw, mouth).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

gob m (genitive guib, plural guib or goban)

  1. bill, beak, nib, tip
    duilleag na ghob ― a leaf in its bill
    gob circe ― a hen's bill
    gob pinnnib of a pen
    gob na stocainn ― a tip of the sock
  2. point
    'gob an rubha ― the point of the headland
    gob na snàthaide ― the point of the needle
  3. mouth
    gob na cùiteige ― the mouth of the whiting
  4. garrulity
  5. babble

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]

  • The Illustrated Gaelic-English Dictionary (Birlinn Limited, 1901–1911, Compiled by Edward Dwelly)
  • A Pronouncing and Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language (John Grant, Edinburgh, 1925, Compiled by Malcolm MacLennan)