pate

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See also: Pate, paté, pâte, pâté, and patë

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English (attested since around 1200), perhaps a shortened form of Old French patene or Medieval Latin patena, both from Latin patina (pan, dish).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pate (plural pates)

  1. (somewhat archaic) The head, particularly the top or crown.
    He had a shiny, bald pate.
  2. (archaic) Wit, cleverness, cognitive abilities.
    • 1598, Love's Labour's Lost, by Shakespeare
      I am resolved; 'tis but a three years' fast:
      The mind shall banquet, though the body pine:
      Fat paunches have lean pates, and dainty bits
      Make rich the ribs, but bankrupt quite the wits.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 4 scene 1
      I thank thee for that jest: here's a garment
      for't: wit shall not go unrewarded while I am king of
      this country: 'Steal by line and level,' is an excellent
      pass of pate: there's another garment for't.
Derived terms[edit]
See also[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Attested since circa 1700, from French pâté, from Old French paste, pastée.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pate (plural pates)

  1. Alternative spelling of pâté (finely-ground paste of meat, fish, etc.)
  2. The interior body, or non-rind portion of cheese, described by its texture, density, and color.

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French pâté.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /pate/, [pʰaˈtˢe]

Noun[edit]

pate c (singular definite pateen, plural indefinite pateer)

  1. pâté

Inflection[edit]


Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

patē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of pateō