pote

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English poten, from Old English potian (to push, thrust, strike, butt, goad), from Proto-Germanic *putōną (to stab, push, poke). Cognate with Dutch poten (to plant), Norwegian pota (to poke). More at put.

Noun form from the word for paw in either Middle Dutch (poot, pote), Middle Low German (pōte), or Middle French (pote).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pote (third-person singular simple present potes, present participle poting, simple past and past participle poted)

  1. (obsolete) To push, thrust.
  2. To poke (with a stick etc.).

Derived terms[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote (plural potes)

  1. (obsolete) An animal's paw's fur or the animal's paw itself.
    • 1398, James Hamilton Wylie, “Appendix A: Duchy of Lancaster Records”, in History of England under Henry the Fourth[2], volume 4, London: Longmans, Green, and Co., published 1898, page 173:
      Fur Potes de Calabr'.
    • 1420, City of London (England). Corporation, Calendar of Plea and Memoranda Rolls Preserved Among the Archives of the Corporation of the City of London at the Guild-hall[3], volume 1413-1437, The University Press, published 1943, page 75:
      One gown of blue colour furred with potes of calabre, 28
    • 1481, William Carton, “68: Godfrey is wounded by a Bear.”, in Mary Noyes Colvin, PhD. editor, Godeffroy of Boloyne; or, The siege and conqueste of Jerusalem[4], London: Published for the Early English Text Society by Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co., translation of original by William of Tyre, published 1893, page 113:
      ... the beeste ... embraced hym with his potes, or feet to fore, ...
    • 1497, “Will of R. Burton”, in Susan Flood editor, St. Albans Wills 1471-1500[5], Hertfordshire Record Society, published 1993, page 141:
      My wife's blewe gowne engrayned furred with powtes.
    • 1612, Andrew Halyburton, “On Imports”, in Cosmo Nelson Innes editor, Ledger of Andrew Halyburton 1492-1503[6], published 1867, Book of Customs and Valuation of Merchandises, Anno. 1612, page 306:
      Foynes—backes the dozen ... tailes the pane or mantle ... powtes the hundreth

Anagrams[edit]


Danish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote c (singular definite poten, plural indefinite poter)

  1. paw

Inflection[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pote

  1. singular present subjunctive of poten

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Shortening of poteau.[1]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m, f (plural potes)

  1. (informal) mate (UK), buddy (US)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trésor de la Langue française informatisée, s.v. "pote" : retrieved 2 June 2013, [1].

Anagrams[edit]


Haitian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French apporter (bring). 

Verb[edit]

pote

  1. bring

Interlingua[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

pote

  1. present of poter
  2. imperative of poter

Latin[edit]

Participle[edit]

pōte

  1. vocative masculine singular of pōtus

Madurese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Malayo-Polynesian *(ma-)putiq.

Adjective[edit]

pote

  1. white (bright and colourless)

Noun[edit]

pote

  1. white (colour)

Portuguese[edit]

pote

Etymology[edit]

From French pot (pot), from Middle French pot, from Old French pot (pot), from Vulgar Latin pottum, pottus (pot, jar), from Proto-Germanic *puttaz (pot, jar, tub), from Proto-Indo-European *budn- (a kind of vessel).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m (plural potes)

  1. pot (container)

Synonyms[edit]


Spanish[edit]

Noun[edit]

pote m (plural potes)

  1. pot
  2. stew

Swahili[edit]

Adverb[edit]

pote

  1. everywhere