relegate

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English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

First attested in 1561: from relēgāt-, the perfect passive participial stem of relēgō (“I dispatch”, “I banish”).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

relegate (third-person singular simple present relegates, present participle relegating, simple past and past participle relegated)

  1. Exile, banish, remove, or send away.
    1. (transitive, done to a person) Exile or banish to a particular place.
    2. (reflexive, obsolete, rare) Remove (oneself) to a distance from something or somewhere.
    3. (transitive, historical, Ancient Rome, done to a person) Banish from proximity to Rome for a set time; compare relegate.
      • 2002, Mark Morford, The Roman Philosophers, ISBN 0-415-18852-0, page 183:
        Eventually his freedom of speech drove Vespasian to relegate him a second time, and shortly after he was executed [] .
    4. (transitive, figuratively) Remove or send to a place far away.
  2. (transitive, in extended use) Consign or assign.
    1. Consign (a person or thing) to a place, position, or role of obscurity, insignificance, oblivion, or (especially) inferiority.
    2. Assign (a thing) to an appropriate place or situation based on appraisal or classification.
    3. (sports, chiefly soccer) Transfer (a sports team) to a lower-ranking league division.
  3. (transitive) Refer or submit.
    1. Refer (a point of contention) to an authority in deference to the judgment thereof.
    2. Submit (something) to someone else for appropriate action thereby; compare delegate.
    3. (now rare) Submit or refer (someone) to someone or something else for some reason or purpose.
Derived terms[edit]
Related terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
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References[edit]

  • relegate, v.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary, second edition (1989)
  • relegate, v.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary (draft revision, March 2010)

Etymology 2[edit]

First attested circa 1550: from the Classical Latin relēgātus (banished person”, “exile), the nominative singular masculine substantive form of relēgātus, the perfect passive participle of relēgō (“I dispatch”, “I banish”).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

relegate (plural relegates)

  1. (Roman history, obsolete) A person who has been banished from proximity to Rome for a set time, but without losing his civil rights.

References[edit]

  • †ˈrelegate, n.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary, second edition (1989)
  • †relegate, n.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary (draft revision, December 2009)

Etymology 3[edit]

First attested circa 1425: from the Classical Latin relēgātus, the perfect passive participle of relēgō (“I dispatch”, “I banish”).

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

relegate (not comparable)

  1. (archaic) Relegated; exiled.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Esperanto[edit]

Adverb[edit]

relegate

  1. present adverbial passive participle of relegi

Italian[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /re.leˈɡa.te/
  • Hyphenation: re‧le‧gà‧te

Verb[edit]

relegate

  1. second-person plural present indicative of relegare
  2. second-person plural imperative of relegare
  3. feminine plural of relegato

Latin[edit]

Verb[edit]

relēgāte

  1. second-person plural present active imperative of relēgō