sál

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See also: sal, Sal, şal, šal, and šál

Czech[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Borrowing from German Saal.[1][2]

Noun[edit]

sál m

  1. room
  2. saloon
  3. hall
  4. theater (operating theater for surgery)
    Zraněného přivezli na operační sál.
Declension[edit]
Derived terms[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

sál

  1. third-person masculine past of sát

References[edit]

  1. ^ 1968, Václav Machek, Etymologický slovník jazyka českého, edition 2nd edition (in Czech), Prague: Academia, page 536:
  2. ^ 2007, Jiří Rejzek, Český etymologický slovník, edition Version 1.0 (in Czech), Prague: Leda:

Hungarian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from German Schal, from English shawl, from Persian شال (šâl, shawl, scarf).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

sál (plural sálak)

  1. scarf
  2. shawl

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]


Icelandic[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse sál, from Old English sāwol, sāwl, from Proto-Germanic *saiwalō.

Noun[edit]

sál f (genitive singular sálar, nominative plural sálir)

  1. a soul
    • Einar Benediktsson
      Aðgát skal höfð í nærveru sálar.
      Exercise caution in the presence of a soul.
    Blóð er gjaldmiðill sálarinnar.
    Blood is the currency of the soul.
Declension[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Attested since the 16th century; origin uncertain. Perhaps from Proto-Germanic *sahalō, from the root *seh- (to cut), originally denoting a bag sewn from cut-out pieces of skin; or perhaps from *sawalō, related to sjóður (purse), or from *saihalō, related to sár (cask).

Noun[edit]

sál f (genitive singular sálar, nominative plural sálar)

  1. a skin bag
Declension[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

References[edit]


Irish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sál

  1. genitive plural of sáil

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
sál shál
after "an", tsál
unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Old Irish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *seh₂l-. Akin to Latin sal, English salt

Noun[edit]

sál m (o-stem)

  1. salt water, brine, seawater
    • c. 900, Sanas Cormaic, from the Yellow Book of Lecan, Corm. Y 1132
      sāil-onn .i. cloch sāil
  2. (by extension) sea, ocean (poetic)
See also[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

Noun[edit]

sál f (ā-stem)

  1. heel
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 68b7
      sál glosses calx
  2. tonsure
Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, Dublin [1]