serf

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old French serf, from Latin servus (slave, serf, servant), perhaps of Etruscan origin

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Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

serf (plural serfs)

  1. A partially free peasant of a low hereditary class, slavishly attached to the land owned by a feudal lord and required to perform labour, enjoying minimal legal or customary rights.
  2. A similar agricultural labourer in 18th and 19th century Europe.
  3. (strategy games) A worker unit.

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Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French, from Latin servus 'slave, serf, servant', perhaps of Etruscan origin

Noun[edit]

serf m (plural serven, diminutive serfje n)

  1. A serf, semifree peasant obliged to remain on the lord's land and to perform extensive chores for him

Synonyms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin servus (slave, serf, servant), perhaps of Etruscan origin.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

serf m (plural serfs, feminine serve)

  1. A serf, semifree peasant obliged to remain on the lord's land and to perform extensive chores for him

Adjective[edit]

serf m (feminine serve, masculine plural serfs, feminine plural serves)

  1. being or like a serf, semifree

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Mauritian Creole[edit]

Etymology[edit]

French cerf.

Noun[edit]

serf

  1. deer

Middle French[edit]

Noun[edit]

serf m (plural serfs)

  1. serf (semifree peasant)

Descendants[edit]


Old French[edit]

Noun[edit]

serf m (oblique plural sers, nominative singular sers, nominative plural serf)

  1. serf (semifree peasant)

Descendants[edit]