sly

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English[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle English sly, sley, from Old Norse slǣgr, slœgr (sly, cunning, literally capable of hitting or striking), from Proto-Germanic *slōgiz (lively, agile, cunning, sly, striking), from Proto-Indo-European *slak- (to hit, throw). Cognate with Icelandic slægur (crafty, sly), Norwegian Nynorsk sløg (sly), German schlau (clever, crafty). Related to sleight, slay.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sly (comparative slier or slyer, superlative sliest or slyest)

  1. Artfully cunning; secretly mischievous; wily.
  2. Dexterous in performing an action, so as to escape notice; nimble; skillful; cautious; shrewd; knowing; — in a good sense.
  3. Done with, and marked by, artful and dexterous secrecy; subtle; as, a sly trick.
  4. Light or delicate; slight; thin.

Synonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

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External links[edit]

Adverb[edit]

sly

  1. Slyly.

Anagrams[edit]


Lower Sorbian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

sly

  1. obsolete spelling of zły (bad, evil)

Swedish[edit]

Noun[edit]

sly n

  1. very young trees, in particular while growing very densely

Declension[edit]