trone

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See also: tron- and trône

English[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Compare French trogne a belly.

Noun[edit]

trone (plural trones)

  1. (obsolete, UK, dialect) A small drain.

Etymology 2[edit]

Late Latin trona, from Latin trutina a balance.

Noun[edit]

trone (plural trones)

  1. (UK, dialect) A steelyard.
  2. (UK, dialect, Scotland, obsolete) A form of weighing machine for heavy wares, consisting of two horizontal bars crossing each other, beaked at the extremities, and supported by a wooden pillar.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Jamieson to this entry?)

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.


Danish[edit]

Danish Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia da

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, seat, throne).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /troːnə/, [ˈtˢʁ̥oːnə]

Noun[edit]

trone c (singular definite tronen, plural indefinite troner)

  1. throne

Inflection[edit]

Verb[edit]

trone (imperative tron, infinitive at trone, present tense troner, past tense tronede, past participle har tronet)

  1. throne

Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

trone

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of tronen

Anagrams[edit]


Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Norwegian Bokmål Wikipedia has articles on:

Wikipedia nbWikipedia nb

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair”, “throne).

Noun[edit]

trone f, m (definite singular trona or tronen, indefinite plural troner, definite plural tronene)

  1. (monarchy) throne
  2. (biblical) throne; the third highest order of angels

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

trone (present tense troner; past tense and past participle trona or tronet)

  1. To sit in a manner which commands obedience; to sit in a dominating way (as if on a throne).

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]


Old French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Latin thronus, from Ancient Greek θρόνος (thrónos, chair”, “throne).

Noun[edit]

trone m (oblique plural trones, nominative singular trones, nominative plural trone)

  1. throne

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]