divine

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English[edit]

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Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old French divin, from Latin dīvīnus, from divus (god).

Adjective[edit]

divine (comparative more divine, superlative most divine)

  1. of or pertaining to a god
  2. eternal, holy, or otherwise godlike.
  3. of superhuman or surpassing excellence
  4. beautiful, heavenly
  5. (obsolete) foreboding; prescient
    • Milton
      Yet oft his heart, divine of something ill, / Misgave him.
  6. Relating to divinity or theology.
    • South
      church history and other divine learning
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Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Noun[edit]

divine (plural divines)

  1. One skilled in divinity; a theologian.
    • Denham
      Poets were the first divines.
  2. A minister of the gospel; a priest; a clergyman.
    • J. Woodbridge
      The first divines of New England were surpassed by none in extensive erudition.
  3. (often capitalized, with 'the') God or a god, particularly in its aspect as a transcendental concept
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Translations[edit]
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle French deviner, from Latin divino.

Verb[edit]

divine (third-person singular simple present divines, present participle divining, simple past and past participle divined)

  1. (transitive) to foretell (something), especially by the use of divination
    • Bancroft
      a sagacity which divined the evil designs
    • Shakespeare
      Darest thou [] divine his downfall?
  2. (transitive) to guess (something)
  3. (transitive) to search for (underground objects or water) using a divining rod
  4. To render divine; to deify.
    • Spenser
      Living on earth like angel new divined.
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French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

divine

  1. feminine form of divin

Italian[edit]

Adjective[edit]

divine

  1. feminine plural of divino

Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From dīvīnus (of divine origin)

Adverb[edit]

dīvīnē (comparative dīvīnius, superlative dīvīnissimē)

  1. prophetically, by divine inspiration
  2. divinely, admirably

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References[edit]

  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)