tsar

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Old Church Slavonic цѣсарь (cěsarĭ), from Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌹𐍃𐌰𐍂 (kaisar, emperor), believed to come from Latin Caesar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tsar (plural tsars)

  1. (historical) An emperor of Russia (before 1917) and of some South Slavic kingdoms.
  2. (figuratively) A person with great power; an autocrat.
  3. (informal, politics, US) An appointed official tasked to regulate or oversee a specific area.

Usage notes[edit]

  • (emperor of Russia): Officially, emperors after 1721 were styled imperator (император (imperator)) rather than tsar (царь (carʹ)); however, the latter is commonly applied to them as well.

Derived terms[edit]

Related terms[edit]

Usage notes[edit]

  • Although commonly believed to mean specifically a Russian emperor, this is not necessarily the case.
  • The spelling czar is the most common one in the US, especially in the figurative and informal senses. Scholarly literature prefers tsar.

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia fr

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Old Church Slavonic цѣсарь (cěsarĭ) believed to come from Latin Caesar.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

tsar m (plural tsars)

  1. czar (Russian nobility)

Related terms[edit]

Anagrams[edit]

External links[edit]


Galician[edit]

Noun[edit]

tsar m (plural tsares)

  1. tsar

Portuguese[edit]

Noun[edit]

tsar m (plural tsares, feminine tsarina, feminine plural tsarinas)

  1. Alternative form of czar

Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Russian царь (carʹ), from Old East Slavic цьсарь (cĭsarĭ), from Old Church Slavonic цѣсарь (cěsarĭ), from Gothic 𐌺𐌰𐌹𐍃𐌰𐍂 (kaisar, emperor), from Latin Caesar.

Noun[edit]

tsar c

  1. tsar

Declension[edit]


Tocharian A[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Tocharian, ultimately from a derivative of Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰesr-, from *ǵʰes-. Cognate with Albanian dorë, Ancient Greek χείρ (kheír), Old Armenian ձեռն (jeṙn), Hittite [script needed] (kessar). Compare Tocharian B ṣar.

Noun[edit]

tsar m

  1. hand