æg

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Danish[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse egg n (egg), from Proto-Germanic *ajją, cognate with Norwegian egg, Swedish ägg, German Ei (English egg is a loan from Old Norse). The Germanic noun derives from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm (egg), cf Latin ōvum, Ancient Greek ᾠόν (ōión), and Polish jajo.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɛːˀɡ/, [ˈeˀɡ̊], [ˈeˀk], (Jutlandic) IPA(key): [ˈɛˀj]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

æg n (singular definite ægget, plural indefinite æg)

  1. egg
Inflection[edit]
Usage notes[edit]

When used as the first part of a compound, an -e interfix may be inserted. This is usually optional, e.g. æggeleder/ægleder, æggebakke/ægbakke, æggeskal/ægskal. One form may be more common at a given time.

References[edit]

æg,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old Norse egg f (edge), from Proto-Germanic *agjō, cognate with English edge and German Ecke (corner).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ɛːˀɡ/, [ˈɛˀɡ̊].

Noun[edit]

æg c (singular definite æggen, plural indefinite ægge)

  1. edge of a blade
Inflection[edit]

References[edit]

æg,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 3[edit]

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

æg

  1. imperative of ægge

Old English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-West Germanic *aij, from Proto-Germanic *ajją, from Proto-Indo-European *h₂ōwyóm.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ǣġ n (nominative plural ǣġru)

  1. egg

Declension[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Middle English: ey, æȝe, aye, ei
    • English: ey

Old Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse egg, from Proto-Germanic *ajją.

Noun[edit]

æg n

  1. egg

Declension[edit]

Descendants[edit]