Aetna

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See also: Ætna

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From the Latin Aetna, from either Ancient Greek Αἴτνη (Aítnē, Aetna) or αἴθω (aíthō, I burn), or from a Sicanian dialect Italic base *aith-na (fiery one), all from Proto-Indo-European *ai-dh, from *h₂eydʰ- (burn; fire). Doublet of Etna.

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Aetna

  1. (Greek mythology and Roman mythology) A nymph in Sicily who, according to legend, gave her name to the volcanic Mount Etna.
  2. (historical) An ancient city in Sicily, in modern Italy, situated at the foot of Mount Etna, on its southern declivity.

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek Αἴτνη (Aítnē, Aetna) or αἴθω (aíthō, I burn), or from a Sicanian dialect Italic base *aith-na (fiery one), all from Proto-Indo-European *ai-dh, from *h₂eydʰ- (burn; fire). Cognate with aestus (hot), aestās (summer).

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Aetna f sg (genitive Aetnae); first declension

  1. Mount Etna (the celebrated volcano of Sicily in modern Italy, in the interior of which, according to fable, was the forge of Vulcan, where the cyclops forged thunderbolts for Jupiter, and under which the latter buried the monster Typhon)
  2. (Greek mythology, Roman mythology) Aetna (nymph in Sicily)
  3. Aetna (an ancient city in Sicily, in modern Italy, situated at the foot of Mount Etna)
    Synonym: Inēssa

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun, singular only.

Case Singular
Nominative Aetna
Genitive Aetnae
Dative Aetnae
Accusative Aetnam
Ablative Aetnā
Vocative Aetna

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

References[edit]

  • Aetna in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Ætna in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, page 83/1
  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.
  • Room, Adrian, Place Names of the World, 2nd ed., McFarland & Co., 2006.

Further reading[edit]