Seneca

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: Séneca

English[edit]

English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Latin Seneca.

Proper noun[edit]

Seneca

  1. A Roman cognomen, notably borne by Lucius Annaeus Seneca, a Roman stoic philosopher, dramatist, and statesman.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

From Dutch Sennecaas, from Algonquian (probably Mahican [Term?]).

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 Seneca people on Wikipedia
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 Seneca language on Wikipedia

Noun[edit]

Seneca (plural Senecas or Seneca)

  1. A member of a tribe of Native Americans in western New York state.
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]
  • Note: These translations are for the plural form.

Proper noun[edit]

Seneca

  1. The Iroquoian language of the Seneca people.
  2. A number of places in the United States, including:
    1. A city, the county seat of Nemaha County, Kansas
    2. A town in Ontario County, New York.
    3. A town and unincorporated community therein, in Crawford County, Wisconsin.
    4. A town in Green Lake County, Wisconsin.
    5. A town in Shawano County, Wisconsin.
    6. A town in Wood County, Wisconsin.

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

See also[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Italian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin Seneca.

Proper noun[edit]

Seneca m

  1. Seneca (Roman philosopher)

Anagrams[edit]


Latin[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Proper noun[edit]

Seneca m (genitive Senecae); first declension

  1. Seneca (Roman philosopher)

Declension[edit]

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative Seneca Senecae
Genitive Senecae Senecārum
Dative Senecae Senecīs
Accusative Senecam Senecās
Ablative Senecā Senecīs
Vocative Seneca Senecae

Descendants[edit]

  • English: Seneca
  • Italian: Seneca

References[edit]

  • Seneca”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • Seneca in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette