accouchement

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See also: Accouchement

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French accoucher (to be delivered of a child, to aid in delivery), from Old French acouchier (to lay down, put to bed, go to bed), from Latin ad + collocare (to lay, put, place). See collate.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

accouchement (countable and uncountable, plural accouchements)

  1. Delivery in childbed; parturition
    Custom required that the royal family and the whole Court should be present at the accouchement of the Princesses.
    • 1763 June, “An account of the law-suit concerning the succession to the late Duke of Douglas, continued”, in The Scots Magazine, volume 25, page 308:
      The prevalence of the reports contradictory to this supposed legitimacy, rendered it necessary to be more minute, than might in common cases have been requisite, in proving the precise time and place of Lady Jane Douglas's alledged accouchement []
    • 1856, St. Louis Medical and Surgical Journal (volume 14, page 153)
      A physician was occupied in making an autopsia of a woman dead of puerperal fever, when some one came for him to terminate an accouchement in the town.

See also[edit]


French[edit]

French Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia fr

Etymology[edit]

accoucher +‎ -ment

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /a.kuʃ.mɑ̃/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

accouchement m (plural accouchements)

  1. delivery (act of giving birth)

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]