actrice

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French actrice, from Latin actrīx. Doublet of actrix.

Noun[edit]

actrice (plural actrices)

  1. (obsolete, rare) female equivalent of actor
    • [1667], [Dudley Loftus], The Vindication of an Injured Lady: Written by the Lady Francesca Maria Lucretia Plunkett, One of the Ladies of the Privy Chamber of the Queen-Mother of England, London, pages 22–23:
      These Actrices, perhaps in their first Scenes, found some applause amongst themselves, but the World knows they have not mended their own reputations, by endeavouring to destroy mine;
    • 1678, J[ean] Gailhard, The Compleat Gentleman: or Directions for the Education of Youth as to Their Breeding at Home and Travelling Abroad, London: [] Tho. Newcomb, for John Starkey, page 94:
      This, if any, is the good which can be learned from Plays; but on the other ſide, the life of Actors and Actrices, their geſtures, actions, carriage, and whatſoever elſe is in them joyned to the bad inclinations of the generality of ſpectators, will quite hinder any good effect, and deſtroy what good diſpoſitions might happen to be in them: []
    • 1711, [Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury], Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times, volume I, page 314:
      By the help of this tragick Actrice, they gain a fairer Audience for the luxurious Fancys, and give their Eratos and other playſome Muſes a fuller Scope in the ſupport of Riot and Debauch.
    • 1714, [Anthony Ashley-Cooper, 3rd Earl of Shaftesbury], Characteristicks, volume III (Miscellaneous Reflections on the Preceding Treatises, and Other Critical Subjects. A Notion of the Tablature, or Judgment of Hercules.), [the second edition corrected], page 368:
      Such ſtudy’d Action and artificial Geſture may be allow’d to the Actors and Actrices of the Stage.
      The 1711 edition has Actreſſes.
    • 1715, Tamworth Reresby, transl., A Collection of Letters, Extracted from the Most Celebrated French Authors. [], London: [] T. Howlatt, for J. Graves, page 55:
      It’s difficult to affect the Audience with a Senſe of what we do not feel our ſelves; and all thoſe Actrices who are famous for repreſenting the Paſſions in ſo lively a manner, would not be able to acquit themſelves with ſo great Applauſe, did they not in their own Hearts experience the moſt Tender Sentiments.

Usage notes[edit]

Chiefly attested in the plural actrices, which could instead be the plural of actrix; however, dictionaries mention that actrice was used.[1][2]

Synonyms[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ John A. Simpson and Edward S. C. Weiner, editors (1989), “actress”, in The Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd edition, Oxford: Clarendon Press, →ISBN: “actress (ˈæktrɪs) Also 8[th century] actrice. [f[rom]. actor + -ess; probably formed independently of Fr[ench]. actrice, which is occasionally found instead.]”
    The only quotation of actrice included is in the plural.
  2. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “actress”, in Online Etymology Dictionary: “Sometimes French actrice was used.”

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French actrice.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌɑkˈtri.sə/
  • Hyphenation: ac‧tri‧ce
  • Rhymes: -isə
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

actrice f (plural actrices, diminutive actricetje n, masculine acteur)

  1. actress

Synonyms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • Afrikaans: aktrise

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French actrice, borrowed from Latin āctrīx.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

actrice f (plural actrices, masculine acteur)

  1. actress
    Synonym: comédienne

Descendants[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Latin[edit]

Noun[edit]

āctrīce

  1. ablative singular of āctrīx

Norman[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French actrice.

Noun[edit]

actrice f (plural actrices)

  1. (Jersey) actress