adaw

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From a- +‎ daw (to daunt). Compare Middle English adawen. More at daw.

Verb[edit]

adaw (third-person singular simple present adaws, present participle adawing, simple past and past participle adawed)

  1. (obsolete) To subdue, daunt.
    • Edmund Spenser
      He, comming home at undertime, there found / The fayrest creature, that he ever saw, / Sitting beside his mother on the ground; / The sight whereof did greatly him adaw.
  2. (obsolete) To awaken, arouse.
    • Geoffrey Chaucer
      A man that waketh of his sleep / He may not suddenly well taken keep / Upon a thing, ne seen it parfitly / Till that he be adawed verily.

See also[edit]

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for adaw in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

Anagrams[edit]


Dupaningan Agta[edit]

Noun[edit]

adaw

  1. baby monkey

Middle Welsh[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

adaw

  1. to leave
  2. to allow
  3. to let go
Conjugation[edit]
Descendants[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

aðaw

  1. to promise
Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Middle Welsh mutation
Radical Soft Nasal H-prothesis
adaw unchanged unchanged hadaw
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.
Middle Welsh mutation
Radical Soft Nasal H-prothesis
aðaw unchanged unchanged haðaw
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.