ado

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: ADO, Ado, adó, adö, and -ado

English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Northern Middle English at do (to do), infinitive of do, don (to do), see do. Influenced by an Old Norse practice of marking the infinitive by using the preposition at, att (compare Danish at gå (to go)). More at at, do.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /əˈduː/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -uː

Noun[edit]

ado (uncountable)

  1. trouble; troublesome business; fuss, commotion
    • c. 1596–1598, William Shakespeare, “The Merchant of Venice”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, OCLC 606515358, [Act I, scene i]:
      Antonio:In sooth, I know not why I am so sad.
      It wearies me; you say it wearies you;
      But how I caught it, found it, or came by it,
      What stuff 'tis made of, whereof it is born,
      I am to learn;
      And such a wantwit sadness makes of me,
      That I have much ado to know myself.
    • 1902, William James, The Varieties of Religious Experience:
      Probably a crab would be filled with a sense of personal outrage if it could hear us class it without ado or apology as a crustacean, and thus dispose of it. “I am no such thing,” it would say; “I am myself, myself alone.”
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:commotion

Usage notes[edit]

Ado is mostly used in set phrases, such as without further ado or much ado about nothing.

Translations[edit]

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Afar[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • (Southern dialects) aadó

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ʌˈdo/
  • Hyphenation: a‧do

Noun[edit]

adó f 

  1. (Northern dialects) generation
  2. (Northern dialects) era

Declension[edit]

Declension of adó
absolutive adó
predicative adó
subjective adó
genitive adó
Postpositioned forms
l-case adól
k-case adók
t-case adót
h-case adóh

References[edit]

  • E. M. Parker; R. J. Hayward (1985), “ado”, in An Afar-English-French dictionary (with Grammatical Notes in English), University of London, →ISBN

Ambonese Malay[edit]

Lemma[edit]

ado

  1. expression of annoyance

French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Clipping of adolescent.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ado m or f (plural ados)

  1. (colloquial) teen, teenager

Maquiritari[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Spanish arroz.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

ado

  1. rice

References[edit]

  • Cáceres, Natalia (2011), “ado”, in Grammaire Fonctionnelle-Typologique du Ye’kwana, Lyon

Pali[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Verb[edit]

ado

  1. second-person singular aorist active of dadāti (to give)

Scots[edit]

Verb[edit]

ado

  1. Alternative form of adae

Noun[edit]

ado (plural adoes)

  1. Alternative form of adae

References[edit]


Sidamo[edit]

Ado.

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Cushitic. Cognates include Burji ada, Hadiyya ado and Kambaata ado.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈado/
  • Hyphenation: a‧do

Noun[edit]

ado f (uncountable)

  1. milk

References[edit]

  • Kazuhiro Kawachi (2007) A grammar of Sidaama (Sidamo), a Cushitic language of Ethiopia, page 62
  • Gizaw Shimelis, editor (2007), “ado”, in Sidaama-Amharic-English dictionary, Addis Ababa: Sidama Information and Culture department

Ternate[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

ado

  1. (intransitive) to arrive

Conjugation[edit]

Conjugation of ado
Singular Plural
Inclusive Exclusive
1st toado foado miado
2nd noado niado
3rd Human oadom, moadof iado, yoado
Non-human iado iado, yoado
* m - masculine, f - feminine, - archaic

References[edit]

  • Rika Hayami-Allen (2001) A descriptive study of the language of Ternate, the northern Moluccas, Indonesia, University of Pittsburgh