anomie

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English[edit]

Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French anomie, from Ancient Greek ἀνομία (anomía, lawlessness), from ἄνομος (ánomos, lawless), from ἀ- (a-, not) + νόμος (nómos, law)

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anomie (countable and uncountable, plural anomies)

  1. Alienation or social instability caused by erosion of standards and values.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Noun[edit]

anomie f

  1. anomie

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested in 1749. Borrowing from French anomie, from Ancient Greek ἀνομία (anomía, lawlessness), from Ancient Greek ἄνομος (ánomos, lawless).

Noun[edit]

anomie f (uncountable)

  1. lawlessness
    • 1749, Wilhelmus Peiffers, Agt korte t'zamenspraken; ingerigt tot onpartydig onderoek en genoegzame wederlegginge van de herrnhuttery, publ. by Gerardus Borstius.
      Z. Het eene met het andere vergeleken levert uit de klaarſte blyken van Antinomie en Anomie.
  2. (sociology) anomie

French[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anomie f (plural anomies)

  1. anomie

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowing from French anomie.

Noun[edit]

anomie f (uncountable)

  1. This term needs a translation to English. Please help out and add a translation, then remove the text {{rfdef}}.