anomie

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From French anomie, from Ancient Greek ἀνομία (anomía, lawlessness), from ἄνομος (ánomos, lawless), from ἀ- (a-, not) + νόμος (nómos, law). Popularized by French sociologist Émile Durkheim.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anomie (countable and uncountable, plural anomies)

  1. Alienation or social instability caused by erosion of standards and values.
    • 2019; Kathryn Edin, Timothy Nelson, Andrew Cherlin, and Robert Francis; "The Tenuous Attachments of Working-Class Men"; Journal of Economic Perspectives:
      This is in line with sociologist Emile Durkheim's seminal study Suicide (1897 [1997]), which argued that "anomie", or normlessness, could explain variations in suicide rates across countries and time.
    • 2020, Freda Adler, The Legacy of Anomie Theory, Routledge (→ISBN)
      Although the hypotheses on what causes anomie are different and reflect the social conditions of different societies, the concept itself refers to the same idea/phenomenon: a weakening of the guiding power of social norms, a loosened social control.
    • 2020 March, Jess Bergman, “I’m Not Feeling Good at All”, in The Baffler[1], number 50:
      No wonder, then, that all of these women are consigned to their lot. What’s the point? From adolescent traumas to adulthood indignities, their anomie has been overdetermined.

Derived terms[edit]

Translations[edit]

Further reading[edit]

Anagrams[edit]


Czech[edit]

Czech Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia cs

Noun[edit]

anomie f

  1. anomie

Dutch[edit]

Etymology[edit]

First attested in 1749. Borrowed from French anomie, from Ancient Greek ἀνομία (anomía, lawlessness), from Ancient Greek ἄνομος (ánomos, lawless).

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˌaː.noːˈmi/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ano‧mie
  • Rhymes: -i

Noun[edit]

anomie f (uncountable)

  1. lawlessness
    • 1749, Wilhelmus Peiffers, Agt korte t'zamenspraken; ingerigt tot onpartydig onderoek en genoegzame wederlegginge van de herrnhuttery, publ. by Gerardus Borstius.
      Z. Het eene met het andere vergeleken levert uit de klaarſte blyken van Antinomie en Anomie.
  2. (sociology) anomie

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Ancient Greek ἀνομία (anomía, lawlessness), from ἄνομος (ánomos, lawless), from ἀ- (a-, not) + νόμος (nómos, law).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

anomie f (plural anomies)

  1. anomie

See also[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French anomie.

Noun[edit]

anomie f (uncountable)

  1. anomie