blate

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Scots blate(timid, sheepish), apparently a conflation of Northern Middle English *blate, *blait(pale, ghastly, terrified), from Old English blāt(pale, livid, ghastly), from Proto-Germanic *blaitaz(pale, discoloured), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰloyd-(pale, pallid) and Middle English bleth, bleath(timid, soft), from Old English blēaþ(gentle, shy, cowardly, timid; slothful, inactive, effeminate), from Proto-Germanic *blauþuz(weak, timid, void, naked). Cognate with German blassen(to make pale), bleich(pale, pallid). More at bleak, bleach.

Adjective[edit]

blate ‎(comparative blater, superlative blatest)

  1. (Scotland, Northern England) Bashful, sheepish.
    • 1934, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Grey Granite, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 491:
      You'd say Not them; fine legs, and Ma struggling into her blouse would say You're no blate. Who told you they're fine?
  2. (Scotland, Northern England) Dull, stupid.

Etymology 2[edit]

Verb[edit]

blate ‎(third-person singular simple present blates, present participle blating, simple past and past participle blated)

  1. Archaic form of bleat.
    • 1851, William Maxwell, The Virginia Historical Register, and Literary Note Book
      Away they fly, like a party of Indians after buffaloes; while along the road, it may be, cattle are bellowing, sheep blating, dogs barking, hens cackling, and crows cawing.

Anagrams[edit]


Dutch[edit]

Verb[edit]

blate

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of blaten

Anagrams[edit]


Scots[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Origin uncertain; perhaps from Old English blāt(pale).

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

blate ‎(comparative blater, superlative blatest)

  1. shy, modest, timid, sheepish
  2. stupid, easily deceived, dull, unpromising