bleak

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Middle English bleke (also bleche > English bleach ‎(pale, bleak)), and bleike (due to Old Norse), and earlier Middle English blak, blac ‎(pale, wan), from Old English blǣc, blǣċ, blāc ‎(bleak, pale, pallid, wan, livid; bright, shining, glittering, flashing) and Old Norse bleikr ‎(pale, whitish)[1], from Proto-Germanic *blaikaz ‎(pale, shining), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰleh₁-, *bʰel- ‎(to shine). Cognate with Dutch bleek ‎(pale, wan, pallid), Low German blek ‎(pale), German bleich ‎(pale, wan, sallow), Danish bleg ‎(pale), Swedish blek ‎(pale, pallid), Faroese bleikur ‎(pale), Icelandic bleikur ‎(pale, pink).

Adjective[edit]

bleak ‎(comparative bleaker, superlative bleakest)

  1. Without color; pale; pallid.
    • Foxe
      When she came out she looked as pale and as bleak as one that were laid out dead.
  2. Desolate and exposed; swept by cold winds.
    • Wordsworth
      Wastes too bleak to rear / The common growth of earth, the foodful ear.
    • Longfellow
      at daybreak, on the bleak sea beach
    A bleak and bare rock.
    They escaped across the bleak landscape.
    A bleak, crater-pocked moonscape.
    We hiked across open meadows and climbed bleak mountains.
  3. Unhappy; cheerless; miserable; emotionally desolate.
    Downtown Albany felt bleak that February after the divorce.
    A bleak future is in store for you.
    The news is bleak.
    The survey paints a bleak picture.
Translations[edit]
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Etymology 2[edit]

Probably from Old Norse bleikja.

Noun[edit]

bleak ‎(plural bleaks)

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Wikipedia

  1. A small European river fish (Alburnus alburnus), of the family Cyprinidae.
Synonyms[edit]
Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ bleak” in Douglas Harper, Online Etymology Dictionary (2001).

Anagrams[edit]