trist

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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See also: třišť

English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /tɹɪst/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɪst

Etymology 1[edit]

Apparently related to trust.

Noun[edit]

trist (plural trists)

  1. (obsolete) Trust, faith.

Verb[edit]

trist (third-person singular simple present trists, present participle tristing, simple past and past participle tristed)

  1. (obsolete) To trust, have faith in.

Etymology 2[edit]

From Old French triste. Compare tryst.

Noun[edit]

trist (plural trists)

  1. (obsolete) A set station in hunting.
  2. (obsolete, form of tryst) (secret meeting).
    • 1543, anonymous, Howard Papers, letter dated September 1543
      George Douglas [] caused a trist to be set between him and the cardinal and four lords; at the which trist he and the cardinal agreed finally.

Etymology 3[edit]

From Middle English trist, from Middle French trist (sad).

Alternative forms[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trist (comparative more trist, superlative most trist)

  1. (obsolete) sad; sorrowful; gloomy

Anagrams[edit]


Breton[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Brythonic *trist, from Latin trīstis. Compare Welsh trist, French triste.

Adjective[edit]

trist

  1. sad

Derived terms[edit]


Catalan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Catalan trist, from Vulgar Latin trīstus, from Latin trīstis, from Proto-Indo-European *tréystis. Compare Occitan triste, Old Spanish tristo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trist (feminine trista, masculine plural trists or tristos, feminine plural tristes)

  1. sad, unhappy

Antonyms[edit]

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Cornish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin trīstis.

Pronunciation[edit]

IPA(key): /triːst/

Adjective[edit]

trist

  1. sad, mournful

References[edit]

  • [1] in Gerlyver Kernewek
  • Gerlyver Meur, 3rd Edition, 2020

Danish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tristis, via French triste and German trist.

Adjective[edit]

trist (neuter trist, plural and definite singular attributive triste, comparative tristere, superlative (predicative) tristest, superlative (attributive) tristeste)

  1. sad
  2. (of a situation) sad

References[edit]


Friulian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin trīstus, from Latin trīstis (with a change in declension), from Proto-Indo-European *tréystis. Compare Italian tristo.

Adjective[edit]

trist

  1. bad, wicked, evil, malevolent

Synonyms[edit]


German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French triste. Ultimately from Latin trīstis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trist (strong nominative masculine singular trister, comparative trister, superlative am tristesten)

  1. dull
  2. miserable
  3. sad

Declension[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • trist” in Duden online
  • trist” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Middle English[edit]

Noun[edit]

trist

  1. Alternative form of trest

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tristis, via French triste and German trist.

Adjective[edit]

trist (neuter singular trist, definite singular and plural triste, comparative tristere, indefinite superlative tristest, definite superlative tristeste)

  1. sad
  2. depressing
  3. (as an adverb) sadly

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin tristis, via French triste and German trist.

Adjective[edit]

trist (neuter singular trist, definite singular and plural triste, comparative tristare, indefinite superlative tristast, definite superlative tristaste)

  1. sad
  2. depressing
  3. (as an adverb) sadly

References[edit]


Occitan[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Inherited from Vulgar Latin trīstus, from Latin trīstis (with a change in declension), from Proto-Indo-European *tréystis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trist m (feminine singular trista, masculine plural trists, feminine plural tristas)

  1. sad

Derived terms[edit]

Further reading[edit]


Piedmontese[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin trīstus, from Latin trīstis (with a change in declension), from Proto-Indo-European *tréystis. Compare Italian tristo.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trist

  1. sad

Romanian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Vulgar Latin trīstus, from Latin trīstis (with a change in declension), from Proto-Indo-European *tréystis. Compare Italian tristo and French triste.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trist m or n (feminine singular tristă, masculine plural triști, feminine and neuter plural triste)

  1. sad

Declension[edit]

Antonyms[edit]

Related terms[edit]


Romansch[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

  • trest (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran)

Etymology[edit]

From Latin trīstis.

Adjective[edit]

trist m (feminine singular trista, masculine plural trists, feminine plural tristas)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) sad

Antonyms[edit]

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan) allegher
  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) legher
  • (Puter, Vallader) alleger

Serbo-Croatian[edit]

Numeral[edit]

trist (Cyrillic spelling трист)

  1. (colloquial) thirty

Synonyms[edit]


Swedish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French triste, from Latin tristis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trist (comparative tristare, superlative tristast)

  1. boring
  2. not fun, bad, a pity
    Det var trist att höra att din kanin dött
    I’m sorry to hear that your bunny died

Declension[edit]

Inflection of trist
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular trist tristare tristast
Neuter singular trist tristare tristast
Plural trista tristare tristast
Masculine plural3 triste tristare tristast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 triste tristare tristaste
All trista tristare tristaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Welsh[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle Welsh trist, from Old Welsh trist, from Proto-Brythonic *trist, from Latin trīstis.

Pronunciation[edit]

Adjective[edit]

trist (feminine singular trist, plural tristion, equative tristed, comparative tristach, superlative tristaf)

  1. sad

Mutation[edit]

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
trist drist nhrist thrist
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “trist”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies