boudin

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from French boudin. Doublet of pudding.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /buːˈdæ̃/, /ˈbuː.dæ̃/
  • (US) IPA(key): /buˈdæ̃/
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

boudin (plural boudins)

  1. A kind of blood sausage in French, Belgian, Luxembourgish and related cuisines.
    • 1995, Frank Bradley, International Marketing Strategy, Prentice Hall PTR
      Eurohucksters will find it difficult to wean the sausage lovers of Liége away from their bursting black Belgian boudins and toward Birmingham's humble bangers. Beer hawkers should fare no better.
    • 2002, Alan Davidson, The Penguin Companion to Food, Penguin Group USA, page 98:
      The principal French boudin competition is held every year at Mortagne-au-Perche in Normandy, attracting hundreds []
    • 2017, Jonathan Meades, The Plagiarist in the Kitchen: A Lifetime's Culinary Thefts, Unbound Publishing (→ISBN):
      In general the softer, mousse-like texture of French boudins is the more appropriate in this instance.
  2. A sausage in southern Louisiana Creole and Cajun cuisine, made from rice, ground pork (occasionally crawfish), and spices in a sausage casing.
  3. A structure formed by boudinage: one or a series of elongated, sausage-shaped section(s) in rock.
    • 1968, I. M. Stevenson, A Geological Reconnaissance of Leaf River Map-area, New Quebec and Northwest Territories:
      Formation of boudins
      Although the shape of the greenstone bodies resembles in many ways that of boudins as described elsewhere (Cloos, 1946, 1947; Ramberg, 1955; Jones, 1959), the shape of the greenstone bodies is believed to be ...
    • 1986, David P. Gold, Carbonatites, Diatremes, and Ultra-alkaline Rocks in the Oka Area, Quebec: May 22-23, 1986
      However, discordant dykes, locally disrupted in boudins, attest to both late dykes and post-crystallization movement of the carbonate rocks. Some of those boudins are interpreted as immiscible silicate blebs in carbonatitic melt []
    • 1994, A. Thomas, Nicholas Culshaw, Kenneth L. Currie, Geological Survey of Canada, Geology of the Lac Ghyvelde-Lac Long Area, Labrador and Quebec
      Small bodies of mafic to ultramafic rocks occur as boudins or sills up to 7 km long within the gneiss.
    • 1995, Northeastern Geology and Environmental Sciences:
      The blocks do not penetrate the leucogneiss foliation that surrounds them, and the result is a single boudin with a composite core.

Derived terms[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle French boudin, from Old French boudin, of uncertain origin. Possibly from a root *bod- (swollen), possibly from Germanic, from Proto-Indo-European *bed- (to swell) (Pok. 96), from *bʰew- (to swell) (Pok. 98-102). This would suggest a connection with Proto-Germanic *paddǭ (toad).[1]

The derivation from Vulgar *botellinus, from botellus (small sausage)[2], the diminutive form of botulus (sausage, black pudding; intestine) is disputed on phonological grounds, namely that the outcome of *botellinus being Old French boel (> modern boyau) rather than *boudin, which instead would require a Vulgar Latin *bolet(t)inus.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

boudin m (plural boudins)

  1. (approximately) blood sausage, black pudding
  2. (inflatable) tube, ring
  3. (colloquial, derogatory) fatty, lardy (person)

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

  • English: boudin

References[edit]

  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 96-102
  2. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2021), “pudding”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

Further reading[edit]