sulk

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English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

Back-formation from sulky, of uncertain origin. Probably from Middle English *sulke, *solke (attested in solcennesse (idleness; laziness), from Old English āsolcennys (idelness; slothfulness; sluggishness; laziness), from Old English āsolcen (sulky, languid), from past participle of āseolcan (be slow; be weak or slothful; languish), from Proto-Germanic *selkaną (to fall in drops; dribble; droop) and ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *selǵ- (to let go, send). Cognate with several Indo-Iranian words deriving from Proto-Indo-Iranian *sarĵ-[1] and possibly with Hittite 𒊭𒀠𒀝𒍣 (ša-al-ak-zi /šalkzi/, knead, mix), although the semantic connection is weak.[2]

Noun[edit]

sulk (plural sulks)

  1. A state of sulking.
    • 1986, John le Carré, A Perfect Spy:
      He thanks our miserable Liberal agent, an unbeliever called Donald Somebody, see the caption, who since the court's arrival on his territory has retired into a fuming sulk from which he has only tonight emerged.
    Leo has been in a sulk all morning.

Verb[edit]

sulk (third-person singular simple present sulks, present participle sulking, simple past and past participle sulked)

  1. (intransitive) to express ill humor or offence by remaining sullenly silent or withdrawn.
Synonyms[edit]
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Translations[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cheung, Johnny (2007), “*harz-”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Iranian Verb (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 2), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN
  2. ^ Kloekhorst, Alwin (2008), “šalk-zi”, in Etymological Dictionary of the Hittite Inherited Lexicon (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 5), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 821

Etymology 2[edit]

Latin sulcus.

Noun[edit]

sulk (plural sulks)

  1. A furrow.

References[edit]

Anagrams[edit]