bringe

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See also: brînge

English[edit]

Verb[edit]

bringe (third-person singular simple present bringes or bringeth, present participle bringing, simple past and past participle broughte)

  1. Obsolete spelling of bring

Anagrams[edit]


Alemannic German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German bringen. Compare German bringen, Dutch brengen, English bring, Gothic 𐌱𐍂𐌹𐌲𐌲𐌰𐌽 (briggan).

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bringe (third-person singular simple present bringt, past participle praacht, auxiliary haa)

  1. to bring

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Danish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /brenɡə/, [ˈb̥ʁæŋə], [ˈb̥ʁæŋŋ̩]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse bringa, from Proto-Germanic *bringô, which is related to *brinkaz (edge, hill).[1] Cognate with Swedish bringa, Old English bringádl (epilepsy).

Noun[edit]

bringe c (singular definite bringen, plural indefinite bringer)

  1. chest (of a larger animal, especially horses)
Inflection[edit]
References[edit]
  1. ^ Pokorny, Julius (1959) Indogermanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch [Indo-European Etymological Dictionary] (in German), volume 1, Bern, München: Francke Verlag, page 167

Etymology 2[edit]

Borrowed from Middle Low German bringen, brengen, from Old Saxon brengian.

Cognate with English bring, German bringen, Dutch brengen, Gothic 𐌱𐍂𐌹𐌲𐌲𐌰𐌽 (briggan). Norwegian bringe and Swedish bringa are also borrowed from Low German.

Verb[edit]

bringe (past tense bragte, past participle bragt)

  1. to bring
  2. to publish (in the mass media)
    Avisen bragte en historie om nogle vindruer.
    The newspaper published a story about some grapes.
Inflection[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
References[edit]

German[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (file)

Verb[edit]

bringe

  1. inflection of bringen:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. first/third-person singular subjunctive I
    3. singular imperative

Middle English[edit]

Verb[edit]

bringe

  1. Alternative form of bryngen

Norwegian Bokmål[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Old Norse bringa.

Noun[edit]

bringe f or m (definite singular bringa or bringen, indefinite plural bringer, definite plural bringene)

  1. chest

Etymology 2[edit]

From Middle Low German bringen.

Verb[edit]

bringe (imperative bring, present tense bringer, passive bringes, simple past brakte or bragte, past participle brakt or bragt, present participle bringende)

  1. to bring, fetch
  2. to take, carry
  3. to deliver
Usage notes[edit]

The verb forms bragte and bragt are only used in Riksmål, and are presumably taken from Danish.

Derived terms[edit]

References[edit]


Norwegian Nynorsk[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Norse bringa.

Noun[edit]

bringe f (definite singular bringa, indefinite plural bringer, definite plural bringene)

  1. chest

References[edit]


Old English[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

  • IPA(key): /ˈbrin.ɡe/, [ˈbriŋ.ɡe]

Verb[edit]

bringe

  1. inflection of bringan:
    1. first-person singular present indicative
    2. first/second/third-person singular present subjunctive

Pennsylvania German[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Middle High German bringen, from Old High German bringan.

Compare German bringen, Dutch brengen, English bring.

Verb[edit]

bringe

  1. to bring

West Frisian[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Frisian brenga, bringa.

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

bringe

  1. to bring

Inflection[edit]

Further reading[edit]

  • bringe”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011