brogue

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English[edit]

A pair of brogues

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology 1[edit]

From Irish bróg (boot, shoe), from Old Irish bróc, itself from Old Norse brók (breeches). The "accent" sense may instead be derived from Irish barróg (a hold (on the tongue)).

Noun[edit]

brogue (plural brogues)

  1. A strong dialectal accent. In Ireland it used to be a term for Irish spoken with a strong English accent, but gradually changed to mean English spoken with a strong Irish accent as English control of Ireland gradually increased and Irish waned as the standard language.
    • 1978, Louis L'Amour, Fair Blows the Wind, Bantam Books, page 62:
      I had no doubt he knew where I was from, for I had the brogue, although not much of it.
    • 2010, Clare Vanderpool, Moon Over Manifest, Random House, page 187:
      “No-man's-land.” The words were spoken in a deep voice filled with salt water and brogue.
    • 2020 November 1, Alan Young, “Sean Connery obituary: From delivering milk in Fountainbridge to the definitive James Bond”, in The Scotsman[1]:
      his brooding good looks and distinct Scottish brogue won him legions of fans worldwide.
  2. A strong Oxford shoe, with ornamental perforations and wing tips.
  3. (dated) A heavy shoe of untanned leather.
Synonyms[edit]
Derived terms[edit]
Translations[edit]

Verb[edit]

brogue (third-person singular simple present brogues, present participle broguing, simple past and past participle brogued)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To speak with a brogue (accent).
  2. (intransitive) To walk.
  3. (transitive) To kick.
  4. (transitive) To punch a hole in, as with an awl.

See also[edit]

Etymology 2[edit]

Possibly from French brouiller.

Verb[edit]

brogue (third-person singular simple present brogues, present participle broguing, simple past and past participle brogued)

  1. (dialect) to fish for eels by disturbing the waters.

Anagrams[edit]

Yola[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Irish bróg.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

brogue

  1. shoe

References[edit]

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith