cáin

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to: navigation, search
See also: cain, Cain, caín, Caín, Caïn, càin, and Cáin

Irish[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Old Irish cáin (law, rule, fine, tax, tribute). The verb is from Old Irish cáinid (revile, rail at, reproach), from the noun.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cáin f (genitive singular cánach or cána, nominative plural cánacha)

  1. (literary)
    1. law, rule, regulation, set of laws or rules or regulations
    2. due, tribute
  2. fine, penalty
  3. impost, tax, taxation

Declension[edit]

Standard inflection (fifth declension):

Alternative inflection (third declension):

Derived terms[edit]

Verb[edit]

cáin (present analytic cáineann, future analytic cáinfidh, verbal noun cáineadh, past participle cáinte) (transitive, intransitive)

  1. fine (issue a fine as punishment)
  2. criticise, condemn, censure

Conjugation[edit]

Alternative conjugation:

Mutation[edit]

Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
cáin cháin gcáin
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • "cáin" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • “cáin” in Foclóir Gaeḋilge agus Béarla, Irish Texts Society, 2nd ed., 1927, by Patrick S. Dinneen.
  • cáin” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.
  • cáinid” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

Old Irish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cáin f

  1. law (system, set of regulations), regulation, rule
  2. legal due, fine, tax, tribute

Inflection[edit]

Feminine i-stem
Singular Dual Plural
Nominative
Vocative
Accusative
Genitive
Dative
Initial mutations of a following adjective:
  • H = triggers aspiration
  • L = triggers lenition
  • N = triggers nasalization

Derived terms[edit]

Descendants[edit]

Mutation[edit]

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
cáin cháin cáin
pronounced with /ɡ(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Further reading[edit]

  • cáin” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.