concentre

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
Jump to navigation Jump to search
See also: concentré

English[edit]

Alternative forms[edit]

Etymology[edit]

con- +‎ centre

Pronunciation[edit]

Verb[edit]

concentre (third-person singular simple present concentres, present participle concentring, simple past and past participle concentred)

  1. (British spelling, archaic, intransitive) To come together at a common centre.
    • 1613, Henry Peacham, “To the Buried Prince” in The Period of Mourning, London: John Helme,[1]
      As from each angle of the Vault
      Wherein thou lyest, a line is brought
      Vnto the Kingly founders heart;
      So vnto thee, from euery part,
      See how our loues doe runne by line,
      And dead, concenter in thy Shrine.
    • 17th–18th century (reprinted 1850), William Beveridge, “The Sacerdotal Benediction in the Name of the Trinity”, reprinted in Twenty-six Sermons on Various Subjects Selected from the Works of the Right Rev. William Beveridge, D.D. Lord Bishop of St. Asaph[2], London: Printed for the Society for Promoting Christian Knowledge, OCLC 697897263, page 80:
      Hence, [] whatsoever perfections or properties (except such as are purely personal) are attributed to any of these divine Persons, are the same in all, and may equally be attributed to every one; they being all and every one the same God, in whom all perfections concentre, or, rather, who is all perfection itself.
    • 1760, Laurence Sterne, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman, London: R. and J. Dodsley, Volume 2, Chapter 19, p. 170,[3]
      [] the medulla oblongata, wherein it was generally agreed by Dutch anatomists, that all the minute nerves from all the organs of the seven senses concentered, like streets and winding alleys, into a square.
    • 1804, William Clark, The Journals of Lewis and Clark:
      Capt. Lewis walked on Shore above this Creek and discovered a high moun from the top of which he had an extensive view, 3 paths Concentering at the moun
  2. (British spelling, archaic, intransitive) To coincide.
  3. (British spelling, archaic, transitive) To bring together at a common centre.
    • 1648, Robert Herrick, Epigram “To the most accomplisht Gentleman, Master Edward Norgate, Clark of the Signet to His Majesty” in Hesperides, London: John Williams and Francis Eglesfield, p. 138,[5]
      For one so rarely tun’d to fit all parts;
      For one to whom espous’d are all the Arts;
      Long have I sought for: but co’d never see
      Them all concenter’d in one man, but Thee.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 8, lines 104-107,[6]
      thir bright officious Lamps,
      Light above Light, for thee alone, as seems,
      In thee concentring all thir precious beams
      Of sacred influence:
    • 1750, Samuel Johnson, The Rambler, No. 61, Tuesday, 16 October, 1750, in The Rambler, Volume 2, London: J. Payne and J. Bouquet, 1752, p. 221,[7]
      Whatever has distinguished the hero; whatever has elevated the wit; whatever has indeared the lover, are all concentered in Mr Frolick, whose life has, for seven years, been a regular interchange of intrigues, dangers, and waggeries []
    • 1795, Helen Maria Williams, Letters Containing a Sketch of the Politics of France, London: G. G. and J. Robinson, Letter 8, p. 230,[8]
      [] for he never on any occasion displayed his sensibility to mortifications, which was in proportion to his excessive vanity, but concentred within his vindictive soul his disgrace, his resentment, and his projects of vengeance.
  4. (British spelling, archaic, transitive) To focus.
    • 1850, Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter, Chapter 23,[9]
      For an instant, the gaze of the horror-stricken multitude was concentred on the ghastly miracle []
    • 1885, George Meredith, Diana of the Crossways, London: Chapman & Hall, Volume 1, Chapter 14, pp. 194-195,[10]
      At Princess Paryli’s Ball two young men of singular elegance were observed by Diana, little though she concentered her attention on any figures of the groups.
    • 1908, Edward Carpenter, The Intermediate Sex, London: Swan Sonnenschein, Chapter 4, p. 83,[11]
      Education has been concentred on intellectual (and physical) development; but the affections have been left to take care of themselves.
  5. (British spelling, archaic, transitive) To condense, to concentrate.

Derived terms[edit]

Synonyms[edit]

  • (come together at a common centre): converge

Anagrams[edit]


French[edit]

Verb[edit]

concentre

  1. first-person singular present indicative of concentrer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of concentrer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of concentrer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of concentrer
  5. second-person singular imperative of concentrer

Anagrams[edit]


Portuguese[edit]

Verb[edit]

concentre

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of concentrar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of concentrar
  3. first-person singular imperative of concentrar
  4. third-person singular imperative of concentrar

Spanish[edit]

Verb[edit]

concentre

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of concentrar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of concentrar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of concentrar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of concentrar.