concoction

Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary
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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin concoctiō.

Pronunciation[edit]

  • (UK) IPA(key): /kənˈkɒkʃən/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /kənˈkɑkʃɪn/, [kʰənˈkʰɑkʃɪn], [kʰəŋˈkʰɑkʃɪn]
  • (file)

Noun[edit]

concoction (countable and uncountable, plural concoctions)

  1. The preparing of a medicine, food or other substance out of many ingredients.
    • 1936, Rollo Ahmed, The Black Art, London: Long, page 178:
      Salt is a very favoured ingredient of spell-binding concoctions.
  2. A mixture prepared in such a way.
  3. Something made up, an invention.
  4. (obsolete) Digestion (of food etc.).
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], “New York Review of Books”, in The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, page 260:
      [Sorrow] hinders concoction, refrigerates the heart, takes away stomach, colour, and sleep; thickens the blood []
  5. (obsolete, figuratively) The act of digesting in the mind; rumination.
  6. (obsolete, medicine) Abatement of a morbid process, such as fever, and return to a normal condition.
  7. (obsolete) The act of perfecting or maturing.
    • 1631, [Francis Bacon], “9. Century.”, in Sylua Syluarum: Or A Naturall Historie. In Ten Centuries. [], 3rd edition, London: [] VVilliam Rawley; [p]rinted by J[ohn] H[aviland] for William Lee [], OCLC 1044372886:
      There are also divers other great alterations of matter and bodies , besides those that tend to concoction and maturation

Translations[edit]


French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin concoctiōnem.

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

concoction f (plural concoctions)

  1. concoction (mixture)

Further reading[edit]


Middle French[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin concoctiōnem.

Noun[edit]

concoction f (plural concoctions)

  1. concoction (mixture)