cutis

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English[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Latin cutis (living skin)

Noun[edit]

cutis (plural cutes)

  1. (anatomy) The true skin or dermis, underlying the epidermis.
    • I was once, I remember, called to a patient who had received a violent contusion in his tibia, by which the exterior cutis was lacerated, so that there was a profuse sanguinary discharge []
    • 1883: Alfred Swaine Taylor, Thomas Stevenson, The principles and practice of medical jurisprudence
      The cutis measures in thickness from a quarter of a line to a line and a half (a line is one-twelfth of an inch).

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Latin[edit]

Etymology[edit]

From Proto-Indo-European *kuH-t-, zero-grade without s-mobile form of *(s)kewH- (to cover). Cognates include Welsh cwd (scrotum), Lithuanian kutỹs (purse) and Old English hȳd (English hide). Related to obscūrus (dark, obscure) and culus (ass).

Pronunciation[edit]

Noun[edit]

cutis f (genitive cutis); third declension

  1. (anatomy) living skin
  2. rind, surface
  3. hide, leather

Inflection[edit]

Third declension i-stem.

Case Singular Plural
nominative cutis cutēs
genitive cutis cutium
dative cutī cutibus
accusative cutem cutēs
ablative cute cutibus
vocative cutis cutēs

References[edit]

  • cutis in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • cutis in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • du Cange, Charles (1883), “cutis”, in G. A. Louis Henschel, Pierre Carpentier, Léopold Favre, editors, Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (in Latin), Niort: L. Favre
  • cutis” in Félix Gaffiot’s Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette (1934)

Spanish[edit]

Pronunciation[edit]

Etymology[edit]

Borrowed from Latin cutis.

Noun[edit]

cutis m (plural cutis)

  1. skin (especially that of the face).

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